Saturday, 30 March 2013

People of Hutton Rudby in the C18/19: Hackforth to Hewison

... from my working notes ... accuracy not guaranteed ... for explanatory note, see post of 14 Feb 2013



Hackforth

ET 257:  2 & 3 Jan 1823:  garth, orchard & houses, probably North End:  John Hackforth was a previous occupier


Hall

1832:  Thomas Hall was buried on Fri 12 Oct a73;  Benjamin Hall on Fri 12 Oct a25;  Jane Hall on 12 Nov a30 [PRs] – Jane Hall’s age is given as 75 in the list “Sepultorum nomina”, but as Jacob Honeyman’s name is altogether omitted, this is probably an error in Mr Barlow’s reading of a list

1 Dec 1775:  Thomas Hall married Sarah Monroe [witnesses:  Jon Eland, William Smith]
22 Dec 1775:  Thomas Hall, papermaker, buried
13 Jan 1794:  bap of Charles, son of Thomas Hall at Whorlton [IGI]
27 Mar 1806:  bap of Benjamin David, son of Thomas Hall at Whorlton [IGI]

Thomas Hall married Ann Shields 23 Nov 1809 [witnesses: John Cliborn, Anne Richardson and Michael Gill]

30 Nov 1817:  Charles Hall of Whorlton married Mary Taylor otp.  Their children’s baptisms:  Jane 1818, Elizabeth 1819, Charles 1821, John 1823, Benjamin 1827, Robinson 1829, Marianne 1831, Isabella 1837.  Charles is described as farmer 1818-9, and labourer thereafter.  Their son Benjamin married in 1851 and remarried in 1861.  Charles died in 1854 a60.  His family’s gravestone [MI 396] is near the cholera mound, and records Charles, Elizabeth his daughter who d1844 a22, and Mary his wife

Robert Hall is a tenant of Barkers Row in 1829

FQ 249:  13 & 14 Mar 1829:  exors of Wayne to Barker:  the Carpenters Arms with the cartwrights shop and stable on the west end thereof, the garden and the privy on the south & backside of the premises, bounded by road to East Rounton to E, by Mrs Elizabeth Hildreth to W & S, by road to East Rounton, John Robinson and Mr Farnaby to N – occ by Edward Meynell;  the garth occ by Edward Meynell, bounded by Elizabeth Hildreth to E, by John Burdon to W, by Thomas Passman, Elizabeth Hildreth, Mr Kendall & William Spence to N, by road to East Rounton to S; the site where buildings lately occupied by John & Hannah Kay & taken down by Mark Barker stood; the garth now used as garden ground to the E & backside of the sd site;  the new houses built by Mark Barker on the site and part of the garth: some of the houses and the garden ground “at present unoccupied”, the others occupied by Robert Hall, William Souter, George Sanderson, John Kay, Mary Lamb, Jackson Richardson, John Wild and Thomas Shaw:  bounded by house & lands bel to Rev Richard Shepherd to E & S, by Arthur Douglas and townstreet to N & W

FP 310:  12 & 13 Feb 1830:  James Catchasides jnr “late of Hutton shopkeeper and now of the township of Stockton miller” sold the ppties to Thomas Hall of Ormsby yeoman
Charles Hall was a former occupant of property, once used as a coachhouse, sold by Kay and Colebeck to Mark Barker in 1830

FT 30:  12 & 13 May 1830:  East Side:  John Kay of Hutton cartwright & others to Mark Barker & trustees:  house heretofore used as a coachhouse & formerly occ by James Ingledew, Mary Collyerson & Diana Swales, then by Elizabeth Farnaby, then by Charles Hall, then by Hannah Best, & now by Matthew Garbutt:  bounded by street to E, Mark Barker to W & S, Arthur Douglas to N

late July 1830:  James Maw went with George Bewick “to Robert Hall’s butcher’s shop;  we afterwards went to the prisoner’s house” [Yorkshire Gazette 12 Mar 1842]

Thomas Hall of Ormesby bought James Catchasides jnr’s premises near the Bay Horse in 1830.  The Hall family kept the property for many years

FU 99:  Will of Thomas Hall late of Ormesby gent dated 18 Oct 1830 & codicil dated 10 Dec 1830:  his brothers Jonathan Hall saddler of Whitby and John Hall grocer of Castleton were his executors

G Hall is in A List of Boys – Middleton Book

“Apprenticeship Indre:  Stephen Hall aged 12 years apprenticed to John Cook of Hutton near Rudby, weaver, to age 21 – April 1823:  made between William Sayer (churchwarden) and Thomas Tweddle and William Sayer (overseers of poor of township of Middleton) and Stephen Hall ‘a poor child belonging to said township of Middleton’” [NYCRO Mic 1204]

Tithe Map:  Charles Hall had a garden no 208 at the corner of South Side

1841 Census:  Charles Hall 45 ag lab and 7 children, South Side
1841 Census:  Stephen Hall 30 linen weaver and family, Castle Yard
1841 Census:  George Hall/Wall 23 servant, at Rudby Mill
1841 Census:  Charles Hall 18 servant at Windy Hill (Brigham)

Mar 1842:  Robert Hall gave evidence at the trial of Robert Goldsbrough [Yorkshire Gazette 12 Mar 1842].  He does not appear in the 1841 Census for Hutton Rudby, and no connection with the other Hall family has been established.

Elizabeth Hall died 26 Dec 1844 a22, grave396 – not in PRs

1851 Census:  South Side:  Charles 57 b Potto ag lab, Mary 51 b Crathorne, children John 28 hand loom weaver linen, Benjamin 23 ag lab, Mary Ann 19, and Edward 9, and grandson Thomas Hall 11, all b Hutton

Stephen Hall and his family may be the Halls who moved to Barnsley in the 1840s, according to Primitive Methodist records.  [Hastings: Ind Vill]

Benjamin Hall 23, labourer, son of Charles, labourer, married Hannah Braithwaite 21, daughter of Robert, tailor, on 3 May 1851 [witnesses:  Robert Oates, Wm Hebbron]

19 Feb 1861:  Will of Robert Braithwaite snr:  retired tailor & draper.  Pbte 11 Aug 1862.  Wife Margaret:  sons Robert jnr & John of Sedgefield: daughters Mary Ann wife of John Kendrew tailor, & Hannah decd wife of Benjamin Hall:  nephew John Oates grocer. [East Side deeds]

Benjamin Hall 32 widower, groom, married Jane Wilkinson of Skutterskelf, servant, daughter of Lawrence, farmer, on 6 Apr 1861 [witnesses:  John Goldsbrough, Jane Fletcher]

1861 Census:  Mary Hall widow, with son 19, next door to
1861 Census:  Benjamin Hall, his 2nd wife and 3 children

Martha Hall is given 3s 6d on 20 Mar 1869, in Barlow’s Notebook

1871 Census:  Benjamin’s family absent.  Matthew Hall 40 master tailor b Crathorne and his family live in West End

1872 Post Office Directory:  Hutton Rudby:  Matthew Hall, tailor

24 Feb 1879:  Matthew Hall general dealer bought property on East Side from Allan Bowes Wilson [East Side deeds]

Oddfellows Board:  Bro:  Benjamin Hall, Middlesbrough, 14 Mar 1879, a53

1881 Census:  108 High Wilson Street, Middlesbrough:  Benjamin Hall’s widow Jane 49, her stepdaughter Mary A. domestic servant 23, Laurence 18 labourer b Hutton Rudby, Benjamin 16 labourer b Marton, Joseph 14 errand boy b Marton, Elizabeth 12 b Middlesbrough and George 9 b Marton

Oddfellows Board:  Bro:  John Hall, Hutton, 31 Mar 1884, a62

1884:  John died a62.  His gravestone [MI 315] records his daughter Lizzie d1893 a19, and Martha his widow d1915 a83

1887:  active members of the Primitive Methodist chapel at the time of building included William Graham Hall, Robert Maughan, Edward Bainbridge, Thomas Sage and Kilvington Rickatson of Trenholme Bar [G Milburn’s notes]
1887:  memorial stones at the new Primitive Methodist chapel were laid by K Rickatson, W Seymour (Spout Bank), Mrs Honeyman, Mrs Eden, Mrs Hall and Mr E Bainbridge; and on behalf of Viscount Falkland, G Y Blair, and Rev Oliver Jackson, a Primitive Methodist minister born in Hutton Rudby [G Milburn’s notes]

Wednesday, 27 March 2013

People of Hutton Rudby in the C18/19: Garbutt to Grundy

... from my working notes ... accuracy not guaranteed ... for explanatory note, see post of 14 Feb 2013



Garbutt

8 Dec 1822:  Joseph Dalking married Jane Garbut [witnesses:  James Smith, Samuel Hebbron]

Matthew Garbutt occupied property, “heretofore used as a coachhouse”, sold by Kay and Colebeck to Mark Barker in 1830

FT 30:  12 & 13 May 1830:  East Side:  John Kay of Hutton cartwright & others to Mark Barker & trustees:  house heretofore used as a coachhouse & formerly occ by James Ingledew, Mary Collyerson & Diana Swales, then by Elizabeth Farnaby, then by Charles Hall, then by Hannah Best, & now by Matthew Garbutt:  bounded by street to E, Mark Barker to W & S, Arthur Douglas to N

late July 1830:  George Garbutt was seen in company with William Huntley and Robert Goldsbrough, who was in 1842 tried for Huntley’s murder, by James Gears and James Maw, and seen drinking with Goldsbrough and others by Anthony Wiles.  The solicitor William Garbutt testified that George Garbutt “disappeared from our neighbourhood in the autumn of 1830.  Warrants have been issued against him, but he could not be found.”  [Yorkshire Gazette 12 Mar 1842]

Tithe Map:  Isaac Whorlton owned Jacques Barn field, which Robert Garbutt occupied

G Garbutt is in A List of Boys – Middleton Book

Christopher Garbutt jnr, joiner & licensed victualler, 1840-1910, was one of those elected to the first Parish Council.

1851 Census:  Kings Head:  Christopher snr 68 b Marton & Ann Garbutt 53 b Yarm, children Mary Ann 13 and Christopher jnr 11 b Potto

1861 Census:  Kings Head:  widow Ann, son Christopher, and lodger Mary Garbutt 64 b Marton, a sister of Thomas Garbutt of Hutton Grange

1871-91 (inc) Censuses:  Kings Head:  Christopher Garbutt & family

1851 Census:  Hutton Grange:  Joseph Garbutt single 35 farmer employing 3 labourers b Marton, and brother Thomas 22 b Eston, sister Jane Garbutt 31 housekeeper b Marton and sister Elizabeth 27 b Marton;  with farm labourers George Lee 18 b Stokesley and Richard Simpson 14 b Hutton Rudby, and house servant Jane Merrington 17 b Hutton Rudby
1851 Census:  Enterpen:  Miss Mary Willins 56 independent b Hutton Rudby, with lodger Miss Mary Garbutt 50 independent b Nunthorpe
1851 Census:  Enterpen:  Dorothy Garbutt lodged with her cousin Mrs Hannah Terry

Joseph & Thomas Garbutt were two sons of Joseph & Jane Garbutt of Eston Grange.  Of the twelve children who survived to adulthood, six were newly settled in Hutton Rudby in the 1851 Census:  Joseph, Thomas, Jane and Elizabeth at Hutton Grange Farm, and Mary and Dorothy lodging in the village.  A previous tenant of Hutton Grange was their relative, Harrison Terry.  Joseph became in some way incapacitated by 1861, and Thomas took over the farm.  The family remained there for many years.
Thomas Garbutt was churchwarden 1855-7; the churchwarden who signed the articles of inquiry 1857

20 Nov 1855:  Eland to Codling: Mustard Garth 1r 28p:  previously occ by Hannah Kay widow, then by Thomas Eland, now used as allotment gardens occupied by John Sidgwick, Robert Preston, Anthony Smith, Anthony Smith jnr, Thomas Milburn, Thomas Crook and Christopher Garbutt

1859 Whellan:  Hutton Rudby:  Mr Garbutt named as one of the principal proprietors of the soil.  “Hutton Grange is a large brick building with stone dressings a quarter of a mile west from the village”.

Jun 1866:  Thomas Garbutt lost 38 out of a herd of 40 “very valuable” cattle in the rinderpest outbreak.  Nearly ¾ of his loss took place before the Act of Compensation was passed, and his friends and neighbours, led by Henry Passman, Henry Chapman & George Wilson, made up a private subscription for his benefit:  Mr Barlow £2;  Henry Passman £10;  Henry Chapman £5;  E J Wilson £5;  Rev James Alder Wilson £2;  T Bowes Wilson, Sunderland £2;  John George Wilson, Durham £1;  Medd Scarth, Carlton £2;  Thomas Foster, Ober Green £5;  Allan Bowes Wilson £5;  George Wilson £10;  William Barugh, Seamer £5;  Miss D Boyes, Hutton £2;  Mr J Goldsbro, Hutton £1;  Mr W Goldsborough, Hutton £5;  Robinson Watson Esq, Stainton £5;  F Watson, Stockton £20;  Two friends G Coates & J Hogg £5;  A friend J Wallis 10/-;  T Nesham, Ormesby £1.  Total £93.10.0

1872 Post Office Directory:  Hutton Rudby:  Miss Garbutt, Enterpen
1872 Post Office Directory:  Hutton Rudby:  Christopher Garbutt, King’s Head
1872 Post Office Directory:  Hutton Rudby:  Mrs Elizabeth Garbutt, linen manufr
1872 Post Office Directory:  Hutton Rudby:  Thomas Garbutt, farmer, Grange

Oddfellows Board:  BG:  Matthw Garbutt, Barnsley, 16 Feb 1844, a50


Monday, 25 March 2013

People of Hutton Rudby in the C18/19: Falkland to Friendly Society

... from my working notes ... accuracy not guaranteed ... for explanatory note, see post of 14 Feb 2013



Falkland

The 10th Viscount Lucius Bentinck Carey 1803-84 married
(1)     Amelia, by whom he had a son Lucius William Charles Augustus Frederick, born 24 Nov 1831, married 11 May 1858 and died 6 Aug 1871.  Buried Penshurst, Kent. [Memorial in chancel]
(2)     Elizabeth Catherine, Dowager Duchess of St Albans (d 2 Dec 1893) on 10 Nov 1859.  She was the youngest daughter of Maj-Gen Joseph Gubbins of Stoneham, Hants and Kilfrush, Co Limerick.  She had married the 9th Duke in May 1839, as his second wife (his first wife, the widow of the banker Coutts, had died without issue); her son was 10th Duke of Saint Albans.
On the death of the 10th Viscount 12 Mar 1884 the UK Barony (he was made Baron Hunsdon by William IV) expired.

FS 461:  2 & 3 Feb 1831:  mortgage of Rudby manor etc by Lord Falkland

FT 547:  4 Feb 1831:  mortgage of Rudby manor etc by Lord Falkland

GG 130:  31 Oct 1835:  Thomas Spence of Hutton weaver & Dorothy his wife (1) Henry Collins of Stokesley gent (2):  2 houses now used as one, the weaver’s shop adjoinging & the garden or orchard of 1r behind, occ by Thomas Spence; the butcher’s shop adjoining the weaver’s shop occ by William Sherwood:  bounded by Lord Falkland to E, street to W, Mrs Kingston to N, Edmund Taylor to S; also Gowdie/Gowlay Hill Garth 1a with cowhouse occ by Thomas Richardson:  bounded by John Charlton to E, by Francis Stainthorpe to W, by street to N, by Jane Willans & Edward Meynell to S; also house with garden & garth behind 2r, occ by William Merrington:  bounded by street to E, William Wood to W, John Seamer to N, John Rymers & Francis Stainthorpe to S; also 3 closes formerly 2 closes called the Cottager 7a, previously occ by William Braithwaite as tenant to William Spence decd:  bounded by Robert Halliday Dobson to E, George Hunter & William Ableson to W, by Rounton road to N, by Richard Johnson to S; “& all other the messuages lands tenements and hereditaments formerly belonging to Thomas Smith late of Hutton yeoman decd and comprised in his Will”

In 1842 Lord Falkland first paid one third of the expense of cleaning the church (£1-15-11 ½d)

Lord Falkland gave £20 to School Acct 1874 – Barlow’s Notebook
Lord Falkland was a major landowner in Kirklevington; there the Archbishop of York held the advowson
In 1860 Lord Falkland added an acre of ground to the churchyard [Eddowes]

“Lord Falkland has come tonight” [letter from E Garbutt 17 Aug 1863:  Letters to a Miller’s Daughter]

Date of Will        16 May 1874, executed in Paris
Date of death        12 Mar 1884
Place of death        the Villa Nevet, Montpellier, buried in cemetery there
Date of Probate    13 Jun 1884
Value of estate        gross personalty £2360-18-9d

1887:  memorial stones at the new Primitive Methodist chapel were laid by K Rickatson, W Seymour (Spout Bank), Mrs Honeyman, Mrs Eden, Mrs Hall and Mr E Bainbridge; and on behalf of Viscount Falkland, G Y Blair, and Rev Oliver Jackson, a Primitive Methodist minister born in Hutton Rudby [G Milburn’s notes]


Friday, 22 March 2013

People of Hutton Rudby in the C18/19: Easby to Emerson

... from my working notes ... accuracy not guaranteed ... for explanatory note, see post of 14 Feb 2013



Easby

DU 390:  2 & 3 Aug 1815:  Thos Cust to Thos Newton, house, stable yard or garth in
Hutton, occ by Wm Carter, previously, and now by John Passman and Wm Easby

EH 212 & EG 295:  relate to the same ppty:  a house which had been divided into two tenements and in 1818 was “lately occupied in four different tenements or dwellinghouses”:  tenants were previously Jane Whorlton & her tenants William Easby, Oliver Jackson & William Honeyman; tenants were in 1818 William Honeyman, Thomas Graham, Robert Walton and Robert Codling:  bounded to E by Christopher Flintoff decd, to S & W by townstreet, to N by David Simpson decd

1823 Baines:  Hutton:  William Easby, schoolmaster
1823 Baines:  Hutton:  vict. Shoulder of Mutton

1841 Census:  Ann Easby 50 ag lab born out of county and Thomas 13 ag lab, North Side


Ebleson

ET 604:  12 & 13 Sep 1823:  4a close in Hutton Moor, previously occ by Bart Wright now by Simon Sidgwick the weaver, bounded by 2 closes lastly sold to William Ebleson to S


Eden

7 Aug 1822:  B D Suggitt left to James Eden, grocer & chandler, in his Will whatever sum Eden owed him at his death

1823 Baines:  Hutton:  James Eden, grocer & tallow chandler

FA 299:  5 & 6 Nov 1824:  2 houses with garden, orchard, shop & stable in Hutton, occ previously by John Horner & Thomasin Burton, then by Thomas Edmund & Thomas Dalkin, then by David Hebbron & John Wiles:  parties:  David Hebbron of Hutton butcher & Michael Hebdon of Stokesley weaver, James Eden of Hutton grocer, Simon Kelsey, Robert Longstaff of Broughton yeoman, William Driver of Yarm gent

31 Jan 1838:  Sarah Allison 20 daughter of Jacob Allison labourer, married William Eden 22 tailor, son of Thomas Eden tailor [witnesses:  Margaret Hebron, Edward Allison]

1841 Census:  William Eden 25 journeyman tailor, Sarah 25, Scarlet 10 mths, with Mary Allison 13, North Side
1841 Census:  Mary Eden 15 servant in household of George Wilson, Enterpen

1851 Census:  William Eden 35 tailor b Thornton-le-Moor and Sarah 34 b Hutton, with son Scarlet 11 b Stockton, Thomas 9, Jane 6, Frances 4 “Sunday scholar” and William 2, the last four b Hutton

William Eden was the Primitive Methodist steward who made the return for the 1851 ecclesiastical census

Oddfellows Board:  Bro:  John Eden, Potto, 18 Oct 1871, a40

1887:  memorial stones at the new Primitive Methodist chapel were laid by K Rickatson, W Seymour (Spout Bank), Mrs Honeyman, Mrs Eden, Mrs Hall and Mr E Bainbridge; and on behalf of Viscount Falkland, G Y Blair, and Rev Oliver Jackson, a Primitive Methodist minister born in Hutton Rudby [G Milburn’s notes]


Wednesday, 20 March 2013

People of Hutton Rudby in the C18/19: Dale to Dunning

... from my working notes ... accuracy not guaranteed ... for explanatory note, see post of 14 Feb 2013



Dale

1872 Post Office Directory:  Hutton Rudby:  Frederick Dale, F.R.C.S., surgeon, Enterpen

Frederick Dale M.D was the doctor who certified Mr Barlow’s death in 1878

Frederick Dale was born in Yarm, and baptised 13 Feb 1843.  His parents were both from Yarm.  He took the MRCS England in 1866, then MD at Edinburgh in 1867, where he had studied.  In 1871 he was a widower with a housekeeper and groom and lived in Enterpen, but within months he had remarried, to Mary Weatherill [cf Letters to a Miller’s daughter].  The 1873 directories give his address as Layton House. 

1877 & 1880 Medical Directories:  medical officer for Hutton Rudby District of Stokesley Union

1881:  he was succeeded by Dr Melvin as medical officer, and in the census is to be found in Stokesley, once more a widower, but now with three children under the age of 8 [cf Miller’s daughter], and practising from College Square.  Directory entries show this address until 1885, adding that he was a certified factory doctor.  Bickford’s Hull Medical Directory shows a Dr Frederick Dale, with the same qualifications, at 40 Charlotte Street, Hull, practising as an accoucheur in 1882.  In 1886 the Medical Directory shows Dale at Weston super Mare, holding the posts of medical officer to the Great Western Railway, and to an Assurance Society (probably part-time posts) [Dr Geoffrey Stout]


Monday, 18 March 2013

People of Hutton Rudby in the C18/19: Coates to Cust

... from my working notes ... accuracy not guaranteed ... for explanatory note, see post of 14 Feb 2013



Coates

William Coates was a former occupant of East Side property bought by Edmund Taylor from John and Ann Pape in 1808

DY 88 & ET 601:  James Coates was a tenant of Philip Gowland in the Bay Horse area in 1816-1823

Robert Coates was churchwarden with James Catchasides in 1819

1823 Baines:  Skutterskelfe:  Robert Coates, Tame bridge, farmer

FT 511:  11 & 12 Jan 1830:  East Side:  Edmund Taylor of Hutton joiner, Thomas Eland of City of London currier, James Bainbridge bricklayer:  the land on which James Bainbridge has lately erected 4 new houses & other buildings, 79 ft x 14 ft, and the passage thereto from the street:  previously occ by Elizabeth Robinson, then by William Coates, then by Edmund Taylor and now by James Bainbridge or his undertenants:  bounded by Thomas Passman to E, by street to W, by Roger Bowes to N, by Edmund Taylor to S:  “heretofore the estate of Joseph Tunstall and his wife Catherine”

William Coates was a tenant of East Side property apparently sold by Edmund Taylor to James Bainbridge in 1830

FU 261:   22 & 23 Nov 1831:  north end of East Side:  James Bainbridge bricklayer & Elizabeth his wife to George Grenside of Stokesley gent:  piece of ground on which he had recently built 4 new houses and other buildings, 79ft long x 14ft wide, with the passage leading to them from the street:  previously occ by Elizabeth Robinson, then by William Coates, then by Edmund Taylor, and now by James Bainbridge or his undertenants:  bounded by Thomas Passman to E, by street to W, by Roger Bowes to N, by Edmund Taylor to S:  “heretofore the estate of Joseph Tunstall & Catherine his wife”

1851 Census:  North Side:  Richard Coates 44 butcher b Castle Levington and Alice 54, also b Castle Levington, with children Ann 18 dressmaker and Robert 15, both b Hilton

Margaret Coates was in the informant on Mrs Barlow’s death certificate in 1852; she signed with her mark

Jun 1866:  Two friends, G Coates & J Hogg, gave £5 to the subscription for Thomas Garbutt


Friday, 15 March 2013

The Richardson brothers: Mayors of Stockton & Middlesbrough

In 1857, Dr William Richardson became mayor of the ancient market town of Stockton-on-Tees.

In 1858, Dr John Richardson became mayor of the new industrial town of Middlesbrough.

They were brothers.

William and John Richardson were born near York.  They both received their medical training at the University College Hospital, London. 

William Richardson (1814-71) was the elder brother.  He must have come to Stockton soon after qualifying, as he is to be found living on the North Side of Silver Street in the census of 1841 – and with him was his younger brother John, as “surgeon pupil.”

William was an important and active figure in the medical, civic and sporting life of Stockton.

He was surgeon to the Stockton Dispensary, a magistrate, alderman, and Mayor of Stockton in 1857-8.  He was for many years the President of the Stockton Cricket Club.  He was instrumental in running the Whitsuntide Sports held at the Cricket Ground and in reviving Stockton Races at the new site at Mandale in 1859.

He and his wife Ann lived at 65 High Street; it seems they did not have children.

Wednesday, 13 March 2013

Descendants of the Jacksons of Lackenby

My Canadian contact, the source of my information on the family of the Revd Thomas Todd and his wife Elizabeth Jackson, has begun a blog to share the family history information that she has gathered over the years.

So if there are any descendants of the Jacksons of Lackenby and Lazenby out there, do keep an eye on Ancestral Road.

Wednesday, 6 March 2013

William Weatherill of Guisborough (1807-73)

The obituary of William Weatherill (1807-73) captures the social change of the 19th century.  He was the second son of a Marske farmer – his father, also William, had the old Hob Hill Farm.  He was born in the violent heyday of smuggling, and in his childhood illicit cargoes were run up from the Saltburn beaches and hidden in the clay holes near his home. 

Smuggling was a huge illegal industry, as this report from the year of William’s birth shows:
Leeds Intelligencer, Monday 26 January 1807 
The smuggling trade on the north coast of Yorkshire, and on the opposite shores in Durham, has been carried on lately to a height almost beyond imagination.  It is computed that upwards of eight or nine hundred tons of different kinds of goods were landed and run in the course of the last two months in the old year; a circumstance loudly calling for the attention of Government.
Ten years later, there was little change in the situation:
Leeds Intelligencer, Monday 24 March 1817 
A terrible engagement took place on Wednesday night, near Whitby, betwixt a revenue cutter and a smuggling vessel. – Both vessels, from the severity of the storm, were run ashore, four of the cutter’s men and seven of the smugglers were killed.  Ten of the men belonging the latter went through York, unpursued, on Thursday and Friday, by the coaches for London.

Tuesday, 5 March 2013

Thomas King of Kirkleatham, brewer & smuggler

Was Captain Thomas King of Wapping related to Thomas King of Kirkleatham? 

No link has been found, but later descendants of the Jacksons of Lackenby certainly speculated about a possible connection.

Thomas King of Kirkleatham was the partner of John Andrew, the famous smuggler of Saltburn.

Smuggling was from 1700 to 1850 an enormous illegal industry:
Leeds Intelligencer, Tuesday 26 December 1769 
Accounts from Redcar, Saltburn, and several other places on the Yorkshire coast, mention that the smuggling trade never was carried to so great a height as at present.  The great number of country people that daily attend the coast, (and who seem to have no other employ but to convey off the goods) is almost incredible. – The revenue officers are very active, and have made several considerable seizures; yet notwithstanding their vigilance, it does not appear possible to suppress this pernicious trade, which is highly detrimental to the revenue and fair trader unless the Honourable Commssioners of his Majesty’s customs please to order a sufficient number of cutters with experienced commanders to be stationed upon the coast at proper distances:  This would certainly have the desired effect, and also prevent wool and sheep being exported, which there is great reason to believe that those delinquents are frequently guilty of. –  That our woollen manufactories have for several years past been upon the declension, is an alarming truth; and certain it is, that the French, thro’ the cheapness of labour, and (it’s to be feared) by getting materials from England, have been enabled to undersell us in foreign markets
The work of the Revenue men was both unpopular and dangerous:
Leeds Intelligencer, Tuesday 20 April 1773 
Last week a smuggling cutter appeared off Witby [Whitby]: She is about 200 tons burthen, carries 14 carriage guns, besides swivels, &c. and about 50 stout men, several of whom were on shore near Saltburn, where they landed a great quantity of spirits, &c. and appear to be a very daring and desperate gang. – An officer belonging to the Customs near that place, endeavouring to seize some goods they had landed, very narrowly escaped with his life. – One of the King’s cutters gave chace to the smugglers, but finding the danger of such an attempt, thought it prudent to depart in peace. –  It is now evident that there is no way to put a stop to this illicit practice, but by repelling force to force.
Occasionally the forces of law were successful.  In the following case, the riding officers (mounted men charged with the duty of patrolling the coast) seized a fine cargo of gin and tea:
Leeds Intelligencer, Tuesday 31 January 1775 
Thursday se’ennight Mr William Fenwick, of Marsk, and Mr Macdonald, of Skiningrave [Skinningrove], riding officers, attacked a smuggler’s long boat, full mann’d, near Saltburn, and seized 58 casks of geneva, and four large bags of fine tea, which they brought off in defiance of the whole crew, and lodged it in the Custom-House warehouse.
For a lively account of the life of a riding officer, have a look at The Worst Jobs in History: Two Thousand Years of Miserable Employment by Tony Robinson (of Time Team and Blackadder) and David Willock!

Sunday, 3 March 2013

The Day Book of Thomas Jackson (1775-1834)

Thomas Jackson (1775-1834), son of George Jackson and Elizabeth King, farmed at Lackenby all his life.  Over a period of years, he kept a Day Book, which was continued after his death by his son John (1808-94).

It is a book of notes and jottings (which may explain the spelling and punctuation) and covers a wide variety of subjects, including records of important family events, household accounts, details of court cases, and notes on farming matters.

There are many miscellaneous farming notes.  He jots down the recipe given him by Robert Thompson for a horse “bad in is wind”:
Robt Thompson Reseat [receipt]
        A Medison for a Horse Bad in is wind take 4 ounces of Garlic 4 ounces of Tax 4 ounces of Flour of Brimstone shread the Garlic small and mix it together into Balls size of a small nutmeg and give it every other Morning The Horse may work as usual
In 1806, he recorded the cost of a threshing machine:
1806  Feb 10    The following is an account of the expense of the Threshin Mushin that I Thos Jackson erected below Lackenby ………..£103. 3. 7