Saturday, 30 August 2014

John Stubbs' diaries (1853-60): names beginning R

These are my original working notes, made quite a few years ago in the days before broadband and easy access to census records etc.  I have done a certain amount of extra work in getting them ready to post here, so some of the entries are now up-to-date.

They include quotations from George Whitehead's Journals, ed. Helier Hibbs, which have been an invaluable resource for which I am very grateful. 

As with the A-Z of Hutton Rudby people, my accuracy is NOT guaranteed!  And I'm afraid they are not quite in alphabetical order.


Mrs Jane REDMAYNE of Taitlands, née HENLOCK
1809-1862.
"Aunt Henlock"
Daughter of John Henlock of Ouseburn and Jane Redmayne of Stainforth, sister to Mrs Mary Stubbs, William Henlock, Isabella Henlock, & Mrs Ann Pick
She married Thomas Redmayne of Taitlands

Diary references:
23 Mar 1853:  “To tell Uncle Henlock the flower at Aunts is done & Aunt Pick that she wants a ham”
Oct 1856:  Aunt & Uncle Redmayne at Redcar with JRS family
3 Aug 1858:  Uncle & Aunt Redmayne come to stay at Bridge Foot

17 Jun 1859:  “Uncle & Aunt Redmayne came to Fredk Scholfield Capes’ christening”
21 Sep 1859:  “Had a letter from Aunt Redmayne asking me to go to Taitlands some day this week”
3 Oct 1859:  “Uncle [Redmayne] went to Clapham Fair    Aunt   Henry  Lizzie & I went to Clapham in the large carriage   I drove there  We had dinner & tea at Miss Redmaynes   Called at the vicarage & Miss Ingleby’s & had some good fun in the fair  Hy Marriner was at home”

5 Mar 1860:  “Wrote to Mother & Aunt Redmayne”
28 Mar 1860:  “Wrote to Aunt Redmayne who is staying at Knaresbro”
28 May 1860:  “Aunt & Uncle Redmayne were at Ouseburn”
6 Jul 1860:  “[Uncle Pick] came home with us to dinner  Aunt Redmayne with Capes”
9 Jul 1860:  “Mr Pick  Father  Aunt Redmayne Capes & I dined at Uncle Picks”
28 Sep 1860:  “... to York  I went to Miss Sutcliffes  Had lunch there   Aunt Redmayne & Mary  Aunt Bell Mrs Stackhouse Miss Cragg & I took a Cab & saw a review by Genl Cathcart of the Yorkshire Volunteers on Knavesmire & a very pretty sight it was   Hy Redmayne & Uncle & Capes were reviewed”
Censuses:
1851:  cf Thomas

Memorial Inscriptions:
Stainforth Church:  Window in memory of Jane & Thomas:  containing the charge of St Peter, with the words, “Feed My sheep; Feed My lambs” and the inscription “To the glory of God and in memory of Thomas and Jane Redmayne, died February 18th and 23rd, 1862.  Erected in 1867.”
Stainforth Church:  no39:  Thomas Redmayne d 23 Feb 1862 a65, and Jane his wife d 18 Feb 1862 a52

TDHS notes::
She was born 25 Feb 1809 and died 18 Feb 1862

Notes
She had two children:  Mary & Henry
In her mother’s Will, she received a ring mounted turquoise and pearl, and [possibly] one ring marked William Hesildon [sentence construction is unclear].  Her sisters Isabella and Ann, then unmarried, were the main beneficiaries.  Thomas Redmayne was an executor, and the Will was made at Taitlands.

Thomas REDMAYNE of    TAITLANDS
c1790-1862
Diary references:
30 Jun 1857:  “Drove Uncle Redmayne’s carriage & pair to meet ladies...”
1 Jul 1857:  “Henry  Mary R & I rode the Carriage horses & Jessie to Stockdale....Jane R went with us to Settle on the black horse”
7 Aug 1858:  “Lizzie & Alice & Mary Redmayne went to School.  Uncle Redmayne went with them on his way to Taitlands”

22 Jan 1859:  “Uncle Redmayne came to Leond Sedgwicks for a day or two”
17 Jun 1859:  “Uncle & Aunt Redmayne came to Fredk Scholfield Capes’ christening”
3 Oct 1859:  “Uncle [Redmayne] went to Clapham Fair    Aunt   Henry  Lizzie & I went to Clapham in the large carriage   I drove there  We had dinner & tea at Miss Redmaynes   Called at the vicarage & Miss Ingleby’s & had some good fun in the fair  Hy Marriner was at home”
8 Oct 1859:  “Uncle   Henry & I went above Stainforth with the greyhounds”
10 Oct 1859:  “...with Uncle & Thos Stackhouse to Austwick Wood to shoot   Mr Foster  Mr Ingleby  John Ingleby  Robt Hargraves  Thos Clapham  Joe Birkbeck  Thos Stackhouse  John Hartley  Uncle & I were there.  We shot 46 hares  17 pheasants & 18 rabbits   We all dined at Thos Claphams at 7 o’clock”
27 Oct 1859:  “to Ouseburn to see Uncle Redmayne who was staying at Uncle Wms”

6 Feb 1860:  “I walked down to Kings Cross Station rather expecting to see Uncle Redmayne & Mary but they did not turn up”
28 May 1860:  “Aunt & Uncle Redmayne were at Ouseburn”
31 May 1860:  “I dined at Uncles    Uncle Redmayne came over”

Tithe Map c1840
Thomas rents land in Stainforth from Elizabeth Brown.  He has in hand 41a 1r 28p, and has tenants, the main one being Richard Armistead, in some 125a in Stainforth, and Richard Armistead (51a) in Settle, and 41a in Langcliffe.  No 347 is house, gardens, road & coachhouse, and no 348 is Taitlands & plantation.

Censuses:
1851:  Stainforth
no1:  Taitlands
Thomas  Redmayne    head    M    54    landed proprietor, 18a [sic], farmer 27a
                        [this does not correspond with Tithe map],
                        emp 1 labourer            b Stainforth
Jane Redmayne        wife    M    41                    b Ouseburn
Jane            dau    U    16    dau                b Taitlands
Henry            son        9    at home            do.-
Mary            dau        8    do.-                do.-
Henry Parker        serv    U    40    coachman            b Settle
Hannah Wharf        serv    U    24    house servant             b Marton
Mary Bateson        serv    U    21    do.-            b Burton in Lonsdale
Isabella Dinsdale    serv    U    20    do.-                b Hawes
Rebecca Wilcock    serv    U    15    do.-                b Stainforth

IGI:
[possibly]
Children of Richard Redmayne and Ann Batty:
Richard, bap 25 Jan 1794 Giggleswick
Ellin, bap 11 June 1795 Giggleswick
Thomas, bap 18 Oct 1796 Giggleswick
Giles, b 13 June 1799, bap 25 July 1799 Giggleswick

Memorial Inscriptions:
Stainforth Church:  Window on south side at the west end in memory of Jane & Thomas:  containing the charge of St Peter, with the words, “Feed My sheep; Feed My lambs” and the inscription “To the glory of God and in memory of Thomas and Jane Redmayne, died February 18th and 23rd, 1862.  Erected in 1867.”
Stainforth Church:  no39:  Thomas Redmayne d 23 Feb 1862 a65, and Jane his wife d 18 Feb 1862 a52
NB  Stainforth church was built from 1839.  Thomas Redmayne subscribed £200 to the building
[possibly]

Giggleswick church:  brass inlaid on church floor to Richard Redmayne of Stainforth d 13 Jun 1799 a31

Notes
Taitlands, built in the C18, is now a Youth Hostel - large house,  cf “The Ancient Parish of Giggleswick” (photos)
Redmans are amongst the oldest families in Ingleton, as cited in the parish registers which commence 1607
Major John Redmayne lived at the old hall of Thornton in the time of Cromwell

Jane REDMAYNE of Taitlands, wife of Dr Leonard William Sedgwick
1834-
daughter of Thomas Redmayne's marriage to Jane Brown, who died 1836
Diary references:
4 Sep 1856:  “After dinner I helped Jane to pack up my things”
26 Nov 1856:  “At Night made a draft copy letter to Jane Redmayne...”
27 Nov 1856:  “Wrote to Jane Redmayne at The Hermitage Caton having drafted the letter last night”
1 Jul 1857:  “Henry  Mary R & I rode the Carriage horses & Jessie to Stockdale....Jane R went with us to Settle on the black horse”

Censuses:
1851: cf Thomas

IGI:
Jane, daughter of Thomas R/Jane [Brown] baptised 25 Jul 1834, Giggleswick

Parish Registers:
14 Jan 1858
Leonard William Sedgwick of full age, bachelor, surgeon, of Boroughbridge, (father, Roger Sedgwick, surgeon) marries Jane Redmayne of full age, spinster, of Taitlands, Stainforth (father, Thomas Redmayne, gentleman)
witnesses:  Thomas Sedgwick, William Richardson, Mary Nixon, Mary Redmayne

Henry REDMAYNE of TAITLANDS
1841-1868
Diary references:
1 Jul 1857:  “Henry  Mary R & I rode the Carriage horses & Jessie to Stockdale....Jane R went with us to Settle on the black horse”
20 Aug 1858:  “Hy Redmayne came tonight to stay till Monday”

24 Aug 1859:  “About ½ past one Steele Rd Hirst & I drove to Starbeck & took train to Bradford where we were joined by Hy Redmayne   we all went to St George’s Hall to hear a grand concert it being the biennial festival  ......  Hy set us to the station & we caught a train for Leeds about eleven where we stayed all night at a Lodging House”
24 Sep 1859:  “drove to Settle ... then went on to the Station to meet Henry who came to spend a fortnight at Taitlands”  [spend the time together shooting, visiting &c]
3 Oct 1859:  “Uncle [Redmayne] went to Clapham Fair    Aunt   Henry  Lizzie & I went to Clapham in the large carriage   I drove there  We had dinner & tea at Miss Redmaynes   Called at the vicarage & Miss Ingleby’s & had some good fun in the fair  Hy Marriner was at home”
10 Oct 1859:  “Hy went back to Bradford this morning”

28 Sep 1860:  “... to York  I went to Miss Sutcliffes  Had lunch there   Aunt Redmayne & Mary  Aunt Bell Mrs Stackhouse Miss Cragg & I took a Cab & saw a review by Genl Cathcart of the Yorkshire Volunteers on Knavesmire & a very pretty sight it was   Hy Redmayne & Uncle & Capes were reviewed”
30 Sep 1860:  “Henry Redmayne who came to Uncle Picks to spend Sunday came up in the afternoon   I went & had tea with him at Uncle Picks”

Censuses:
1851: cf Thomas

IGI:
Henry, son of Thomas R/Jane baptised 28 Dec 1841, Giggleswick

Yorkshire Post & Leeds Intelligencer 19 March 1868
Redmayne - March 13, at Taitlands, near Settle, aged 26, Henry Redmayne, Esq

Yorkshire Post & Leeds Intelligencer 21 March 1868
Stainforth - Military Funeral - At Stainforth, on Wednesday, the members of the North Craven Rifles attended the funeral of Ensign Redmayne, who died on the 13th inst., aged 26 years.  The mournful procession, headed by the rifle corps, the band playing the "Dead March," proceeded from the deceased gentleman's residence, at Taitlands, to St Peter's Church, STainforth, where his body was interred in the family vault.  The funeral service was read by the Rev Mr Hearnley, after which the accustomed number of three volleys were fired over the grave by the members of the corps

Memorial Inscriptions:
St Peter, Stainforth:  no38:  Henry Redmayne, d13 Mar 1868 a26 [cf diaries 15-19 Mar]

Mary REDMAYNE of Taitlands, wife of Dr James Sedgwick of Boroughbridge
"Polly" "Mary James"
1843-1892
Diary references:
1 Jul 1857:  “Henry  Mary R & I rode the Carriage horses & Jessie to Stockdale....Jane R went with us to Settle on the black horse”

7 Aug 1858:  “Lizzie & Alice & Mary Redmayne went to school.  Uncle Redmayne went with them on his way to Taitlands”  [earlier references are to Miss Adcock’s at Ilkley ie. Ilkley Hall school]

23 Jun 1859:  “[at Bbdge fair time]  Uncle & Aunt Redmayne ... & Mary Redmayne dined with us”
26 Jun 1859:  “to Uncle Wms ... to Ouseburn Church at night  Uncle Redmayne & Mary set me part of the way home”

3 Mar 1860:  “Alice & Mary Redmayne came to stay till Monday at Janes [Mrs Charles]”
28 Apr 1860:  “called at Jane’s & saw Alice & Mary Redmayne”
29 Apr 1860:  “Took Mary Redmayne to Highbury Church in the evg”
30 Apr 1860:  “Went with Alice & Mary Redmayne to the Angel”
28 Sep 1860:  “... to York  I went to Miss Sutcliffes  Had lunch there   Aunt Redmayne & Mary  Aunt Bell Mrs Stackhouse Miss Cragg & I took a Cab & saw a review by Genl Cathcart of the Yorkshire Volunteers on Knavesmire & a very pretty sight it was   Hy Redmayne & Uncle & Capes were reviewed”

Censuses:
1851:  cf Thomas

Parish Registers:
Witnesses her half-sister’s marriage, 14 Jan 1858

TDHS notes:
She was born 24 Mar 1843.  Married James Sedgwick, surgeon of Boroughbridge, 14 Feb 1863, and died 3 Jun 1892.  She had three children:  Ethel Mary, b 5 Feb 1864; Harold James, b 12 Nov 1865, solicitor; and Hubert, b 28 Sep 1869, surgeon.

James and Mary stayed in Boroughbridge where James practised as a doctor.  Mary James, as she was known to distinguish her from her husband’s sister, and her family were naturally a part of the family social circle.  “Alice is at a juvenile party at James’s we had them all last night and a most rackety eveng we had but they were all most good and happy  only the Sedgwicks Capes and little Price”, wrote Mary on 13 Jan 1872.  “Mary James … poor boy goes on nicely but it is pitiable to see him with his arm in a sling”, she wrote in February, and a month later  “Mary James is a very good neighbor [sic] and much interested in you and the baby   little [Hubert?] took a fancy to bringing me a bunch of violets almost every day”. When Alice was due to go to Cambridge for the boat races that May, her mother wrote, “Mary James travels with her to Hichen and the two children on their way to London  that will be very nice for them all”.
James was a busy local doctor:  “James is sadly harassed there is so much sickness around us in severe colds” wrote Mary in 1872.  The letters record their difficulty in getting away on holiday that year.  “Mary James and James are wishing to go up the Rhine if they can get off about the 19th” wrote Mary on 10 August, but a week later she told John, “James and Mary hope to go into Ireland for a fortnight if they can get off next Monday.”  The letters do not reveal whether they managed to get there or not.
Mary seems to have been a sociable woman:  “Mary and James are very well   we see them almost every day”, wrote Mary in October 1872, and some days later, “I was at James’s on Saturday eveng where we had a beautiful Pheasant and Mary came to tea with me yesterday”.  In November she wrote, “Mary James was going to a ball at Kirby Lonsdale next week to chaperone Mrs Fosters party  She is much enjoying the prospect” and “Mary James has got home looking rather flat and dull after all the gaiety of the ball which she thoroughly enjoyed and staid ten days with the Fosters”.  The Fosters seem to have been relations of the Redmaynes.  “We have had rather a gay week.  Monday, Jane Henry and Alice dined at James’s only themselves and Alice Foster … Thursday we were all at Uncles to a meat tea  the Sedgwicks Joes and ourselves  they acted charades, James and Henry were admirable performers”, Mary wrote in January 1874. 
Mary was an amateur singer and not afraid to perform in public.  She was one of the singers at an amateur concert in Knaresborough in 1874.  She may also have been fond of tennis, as in the early 1880s the Jameses had  a lawn tennis court at their house, where Alice went to play.
There are references to Mary being unwell on occasion, but it must have been a terrible shock when this sociable, kind, active neighbour died “of apoplexy” “very suddenly at Victoria Station London” on Whit Sunday night, 4 June 1892 at the age of about 50. 
James was a West Riding JP, and was in partnership with Henry Ingledew Daggett who married Lizzy Stubbs’ daughter Mary Dunhill.  In early January 1900 James and his daughter Ethel, then 36, left Boroughbridge having sold Ladywell House to Dr Daggett  – and moved to London

Mrs Mary REDMAYNE of/in TOWN HEAD, SETTLE
1766-1853.
Sister of John Henlock of Ouseburn, widow of Giles Redmayne of Settle

Diary references:
Wednesday February 9 1853: Went twice to school & went to see Old Aunt Redmayne
Tuesday May 24 1853: Old Aunt Redmaynes sale Town Head

Pigots 1834:       
Settle, [gentry & clergy]  Mrs Mary Redmayne, Settle

Tithe Map c1840
No 85, house & garden in hand

1851:  Settle:  Constitution Hill
Mary Redmayne, widow, 84, house proprietor, b Great Ouseburn
servant:  Margaret Calverley,  U, 46, b Newithhead Hall

Ann “Mrs Robert” REDMAYNE    of SETTLE
Mrs Ann Redmayne was the widow of Robert Redmayne, who had been a Linen & Woollen Draper and kept the Stamp Office.  Mrs Robert and her daughter by a previous marriage Miss Mary Metcalfe lived in Church Street.  Mary Metcalfe visited Ouseburn and Boroughbridge in 1856 in company with Bell Baldwin and her little girl.  Robert Redmayne was probably the brother of Jane Redmayne, who married John Henlock and was Mary Stubbs' mother.

Diary references:
10 Feb 1853:  “...called at Mrs Roberts”
15 Aug 1856:  “..called at the Terrace   had tea at Mrs Roberts”
2 Sep 1856:  “called at Harrisons  Mrs Roberts’ & the Terrace”
4 Sep 1856:  “..called on Harrison  Mrs Roberts & the Terrace”
27 Jun 1858:  “I called at Mrs Roberts & the Terrace”

Pigots 1834:       
Settle [misc]   
Redmayne, Rt, distributor of stamps, Settle

1851 Settle: Church Street
Ann Redmayne, W, 62, stamp distributor, b Lancs, Tunstal
Mary Metcalfe, daughter, U, 39, at home b do.-
                                   
Memorial Inscriptions:
Giggleswick:
273    Sacred to the memory of Robert Redmayne of Settle d 8 Sep 1847 a67 yrs and Ann his wife d 11 Nov 1863 a75 [no mention in diaries]

TDHS notes:
Ann R of Settle died 11 Nov 1863 aged 75

Notes
Ann Redmayne of Church street in 1851 is the widow of Robert Redmayne, who died in 1847.  He was a Linen & Woollen Draper, and Stamp Office [Directory 1837].  He had rented a house and shop in the Market Place near the Town Hall from Margaret Birkbeck, and a barn, croft, garden and plantation from her, just below the Independent Chapel in the north end of Upper Settle, under Low High Hill - Tithe nos. 152, 189-190.

Miss Mary REDMAYNE of Clapham, Yorks
Lived with her niece Mary Marriner
Diary references:
2 Sep 1856:  “..went to Clapham had tea with Miss Marriner  Miss R  Mrs M & Mr Marriner were out”

3 Oct 1859:  “...went to Clapham in the large carriage ... We had dinner & tea at Miss Redmaynes”

Censuses: 1851 Clapham Yks
Mary Redmayne, head,     U, 59, gentlewoman annuitant     b Yks, Ingleton
Mary Marriner, niece, U    , 47, do.-            do.-
2 servants

TDHS notes:
Mary R of Clapham Vicarage d 9 Mar 1872 aged 80

Notes
The vicar of Clapham 1841-1876 was John Marriner

Robert RHEEDER of/in  GREAT OUSEBURN
Diary references:
13 Jun 1858:  “[at Ouseburn]..Aunt Bell  Aunt Henlock & Mr Robt Rheeder came down in the afternoon”

9 Aug 1860:  “Richd Paver & Rt Rheeder came to Uncle Picks to measure some beasts”
10 Dec 1860:  “Uncle Pick & I drove to Hammerton Statn where we met Robson & Rheeder & we went to York   went over the Cattle Show”

Censuses: 1851 Ouseburn:
Rheeder William, 33    farmer of 200a   b Gt Ouseburn        fol 356
Peggy, 67 [his mother]  
elsewhere:
Ouseburn index
Rheeder    Mary        15                b Marton        fol 254

Rev William  RICHARDSON, vicar of STAINFORTH
Diary references:
13 Jan 1858:  “...I went to sleep at Stackhouses   Leonard [the bridegroom] went to Richardsons”

28 Aug 1859:  “Twice to BB Church & once to Kirby Hill  we had Mr Richardson of Stainforth to preach in the evening”
1 Sep 1859:  “At night we had Mr & Mrs LW Sedgwick & Mr Richardson of Stainforth who was staying with them”

Slaters 1849:        “Gentry & clergy:  Rev Wm Richardson, Stainforth”

Census 1851:  Stainforth
William Richardson, 40, Perpetual Curate of Stainforth, b Kirkby Lonsdale Westmorland
servants: housekeeper, her daughter and 11 yr old child

General histories etc:
“The churches of the Deanery of North Craven”:  memorial window to Rev William Richardson, who died 26 Mar 1865, a54 years”

Mrs RICHARDSON of/in    DISHFORTH / THIRSK
sister of Mark Barroby
Diary references:
12Nov 1855:  “[while at Dishforth] Drove Mrs Richardson down to Thirsk  stayed dinner & returned”
20 Jul 1856:  “Cousin Mark & I went to Thirsk   no one at home but Ryott & Mrs Richardson”
5 Dec 1858:  “rode Joes mare to Dishforth to see Miss Barroby & Mrs Richardson [after Mark Barroby’s death]”

26 Jun 1859:  “Poor Mrs Richardson of Dishforth died today”
29 jUN 1859:  “Poor Mrs Richardson of Dishforth was buried at Topcliffe today”

Notes
Mark Barroby had two married sisters [Bp Stubbs] :  Ann, who married Richard Richardson & died 1859, and Mary, who married William Richardson of Leeds

Dr William Hall RYOTT of THIRSK
related to Mark Barroby
Diary references:
10 Feb 1856:  “ Cousin Mark & I went to Thirsk   dined at Ryotts   Met Mrs Wm Richardson”
21 Apr 1856:  “walked to Dishforth....Mary Ellen was there”
20 Jul 1856:  “Cousin Mark & I went to Thirsk  no one at home but Ryott & Mrs Richardson”

15 Feb 1857:  “[at Dishforth]  Ryott dined with us” [also in June & July]
17 Jan 1857:  “...rode..to Dishforth  Ryotts children were all there”
18 Jan 1857:  “..to Topcliffe Church   Willey Ryott & I walked back”

1 May 1859:  “Had tea at Joes   Ryotts Governess & Lizzie Ryott came to BB Church in the evening”

Post Office 1857:   
in private & in commercial: “William Hall Ryott, esq, surgeon, Market Pl”

Notes
Mark Barroby’s sister married William Richardson of Leeds.  Their daughter Anne married Wm Hall Ryott MD of Thirsk [Bp Stubbs p 33].  They had, according to BpS, 13 children:
Mary Ellen 1844, Wm B 1846, Mark B 1850, Margt 1852, Edward C 1853, Thos Beck 1855, Emily Agnes 1857,  Emma Mary 1858, Fredk Archib 186-, Reginald 1861 , Lewis Alfred 1863, Alice 1864, and Elizabeth. [p33]
Mary Ellen Ryott married John Rhodes (d1870); Elizabeth married Wm Huby; Margaret married John Sheepshanks, Bp of Norwick;  Emma Mary married F. Barroby.

Mrs William RICHARDSON of/in THIRSK
Diary references:
10 Feb 1856:  “Cousin Mark & I went to Thirsk    dined at Ryotts   Met Mrs Wm Richardson”

Notes
Sister of Mark Barroby, and mother of Mrs Ryott

William RICHARDSON of/in DISHFORTH area ?
Diary references:
5 Oct 1856:  “[while at Dishforth]  Cousin Mark went to Wm Richardsons Christening   Mr Dutton & I went to Dishforth Church”
26 Jul 1857:  “[while at Dishforth] Went to Dishforth Church in the morning  Mr & Miss Barroby went to Wm Richardsons childs christening”

Parish Registers:
could find no record of the baptisms in Thirsk or Topcliffe; no Dishforth registers seen yet

John RHODES of RIPON
Diary references:
12 Apr 1859:  “Drove Father & Sarah to Ripon on business  Called on John Rhodes with whom I had luncheon”

22 Jul 1859:  “at the Cricket Ground when Mr Rhodes’ 11 played Lawsons 11 but the former had the better of it”

5 Mar 1860:  “in Fleet St I met John Rhodes of Ripon   He walked a good way with me”
2 Aug 1860:  “Joe  Tom & I drove to Ripon   I called on Rhodes”

Notes
Mark Barroby’s great niece, Mary Ellen Ryott, b 1844, married John Rhodes (d1870) [BpS p33]

ROBINSON, George ROBINSON    of/in SETTLE
Diary references:
Giggleswick class lists 1853
18 Aug 1856:  “Fanny told me of her smash with George Robinson”
31 Aug 1856:  “[at Taitlands]  went to Langcliffe church where I saw Jane & Sally Edmondson & Robinson”

Slaters 1849:       
“Miss Susannah Constantine Robinson, Settle
Mr Wm Robinson, Settle
Henry Robinson, attorney, Settle
Thomas Robinson, surgeon, Settle (& registrar of births & deaths)
Robert Robinson, tailor, Settle”
           
1851 Settle  Constitution Hill
Susanna Constantine Robinson, U, 60, proprietor of shares, b Chatburn Lancs
2 servants

1851 Settle
Duke Street
William Robinson, W, 61, Justice of the peace & banker, b Lancs, Chatburn
William, son, 27, shareholder & landed proprietor, b Settle
John, son, 26, B A Clergyman without cure of souls, b Settle
George Robinson, 15, nephew, banker's clerk, b Blackburn
housekeeper, cook, housemaid

1851 Settle
Market Place
Thomas Robinson, 58, Surgeon Apothecary & accoucheur b Clapham
Elizabeth, 62, wife, b Cowen Bridge, Eliza Josine, U, 28, daughter, b Settle
2 servants

1851 Settle Market Place
Henry Robinson, 35, solicitor, b Alford, Lincs
Elspet, 34, wife, b London,
5 children under age of 7
Jane Robinson, U, 25, sister b Alford,
2 servants

General histories etc:
“The churches of the deanery of North Craven”:  Giggleswick: a window was given by William Robinson Esq, banker of Settle, in memory of his wife Jane 1858, and another by his sons William and John in his memory in 1872.

Miles RAINFORTH
Diary references:
25 Oct 1858:  “Mr Chr Barroby  Mr Jas Morley  Uncle Wm  Uncle Pick & Mr Miles Rainforth dined with us - at Noon was in the fair with Uncle Pick”

Post Office 1857:   
[farmers]   
Rainforth, M, Rainton,Topcliffe, Thirsk           
[Rainton]   
Miles Rainforth, farmer, Southfield Cott       

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