Sunday, 31 August 2014

John Stubbs' diaries (1853-60): Stubbs

These are my original working notes, made quite a few years ago in the days before broadband and easy access to census records etc.  I have done a certain amount of extra work in getting them ready to post here, so some of the entries are now up-to-date.

They include quotations from George Whitehead's Journals, ed. Helier Hibbs, which have been an invaluable resource for which I am very grateful. 

As with the A-Z of Hutton Rudby people, my accuracy is NOT guaranteed!  And I'm afraid they are not quite in alphabetical order.


Thomas STUBBS of Boroughbridge
1796-1867
Born Bridge Foot, Borobdge 3[or 23] Jul 1796 “Twenty Minutes before Nine Eveg” [paper sent by Alice Stubbs to TDHS]
Father of John

Diary references:
Jan a/c 1853:  recd 27th £2 6s
June a/c 1853:  “What Father owes Uncle”

Jan a/c 1855:  “Recd of Father £3 2s 6d.  [Paid to] Father £3 2s 6d”
Apr a/c 1855:  “Recd of Father £2”
Jul a/c 1855:  “Recd of Father £6 6s.  Pd Father £3”

Feb 22 1856:  “We then went to Capes’s to sup  Aunt Ann, Aunt Bell, Aunt Hirst, Father, Mama  Joe & I”
Mar 1, 11, 14, 27:  “..At Night Joe & I were busy with Fathers books” .......”Went to York with Father”....”Richd Walburn of Norton was buried today   Joe & Father both went”.........  “Cousin Bessie Stamper  Father & Mama went to Helperby to fetch Alice”
Jul 14:  “Father Aunt Hirst & Mary went with the Sedgwicks to Scarbro”
Aug 11, 12:  “Father & I went to meet the train”... “Today Father & Joe went to Ripley”
Sep 16, 17:  “At night Father & I walked nearly to Ellenthorp  Then we went to the Doctors  all the rest were there to tea”  “At Noon Father & I walked up towards Kirby Hill by the fields..”
Oct 1, 18, 20,:  “At Noon Father Mother Aunt Redmayne & Uncle & Aunt Bell & Sarah Sedgwick went to Redcar”.. “..Went to Redcar...Father & Mother  Aunt & Uncle Redmayne Sarah Sedgwick & Miss Cunnyngham were there”  “Father & I walked to Coatham  had some porter at the Lobster”
Nov 6, 10:  “At Noon went & had a walk & met Father as I was coming back & I turned again with him”   “Father & Mama dined at Capes’”
Dec 15, 23, 25:  “Father & Mother were at Ouseburn today  Mr Brown from Australia & Uncle Redmayne were there - They did not get home till half past nine”   “Went a walk up Topcliffe Road  met Father”  “Father Tom & I went to Aldbro [church] in the afternoon”

Jan 8, 17, 28 1857:  “Father & I were the only two at home   All the rest had gone to the Concert Servants as well”  “Father went to Taitlands today as he was going to Eliza Stubbs Wedding”  “Father came home from Taitlands tonight”
Feb 4, 22:  “At Noon Father went with Lizzy to Arthington on her way to school”  “Stayed at home with Father in the evening”
Mar 5, 17:  “Father & Mother were at Capes’” “At Noon walked with Father round by Milby”
Apr 21:  “Father & Mother were at Capes”
May 12:  “Father & Mother  Capes & Jane set off in Mrs Morrells Cab to Joes Wedding at ½ past seven”
Jun 9:  “Father & Mother were at Langthorpe”
Jul 20, 24:  “At Noon Father & Mother set off for Doncaster”  “Father & Mother came home from Mrs Workmans”
Aug 16:  “Nelly [Scholfield] & Jane sat with Father & me in our pew at Aldbro”
Sep 3:  “Father & Mother went to Redcar”
Oct 8:  “Father & Mother came from Redcar”
Nov 17:  “Father & I were alone”
Dec 7:  “Father & I rode the old Pony & Joes Mare to Langthorp Field”
16, 30 Sep 1858:  “Father & Mother went to Redcar”  “Father & Mother came from Redcar” [after Aunt Hirst’s death]

18 Mar 1859:  “Father & Mother supped at Uncles”
12 Apr 1859:  “Drove Father & Sarah to Ripon on business”
13 Dec 1859:  “Father & Mother were at Knaresbro”

9 Jan 1860:  “Alice & I walked to Uncle Picks ... & then ... to the workhouse & Capes & I came on to BB together  Father brought Alice home”
29 Jun 1860:  “dined at Uncle Picks  Father came on & he & I went to see Uncle Wm  we came home with Father”
9 Jul 1860:  “Went with Father to Ouseburn  Mr Pick Father Aunt Redmayne Capes & I dined at Uncle Picks  went to Browns to the sale of the late Mr Crosby’s property”
23 Jul 1860:  “Father Tom & I drove to Ouseburn & brot Alice from there”
29 Aug 1860:  “Father & Mother & Dora Hirst went to Redcar at noon”
26 Sep 1860:  “Father & Mother came home from Redcar”
11 Oct 1860:  “Father & Mother were just returning from Knaresbro as we started home”
30 Oct 1860:  “at home with Father at night”
22 Nov 1860:  “Father fetched us home in the Dog Cart as there was a letter from Geo Capes which wanted answering (Re Daniel’s Practice)”
Slaters 1849:       
“Spirit Merchants:  Stubbs, Thos (& wine), Borobdge”
“Grocers & tea dealers:  Stubbs Thomas (& wine & spirit merchant) Borobdge”

Tithe Map c1840
In  hand: 126 house & garden, 1r 5p; occupied by Thos Brittain: 79 house & yard, 30p

Memorial Inscriptions:
An east window in the side chapel of Boroughbridge church is dedicated to Thomas Stubbs, died 6 Nov 1867 aged 71 “erected by his children”

Parish Registers:
Borobridge:  burial:  Thomas Stubbs, 11 Nov 1867, aged 71

Alice Stubbs’ Bible:
Married Gt Ouseburn 21 Sep 1824 by Rev F B Emmett, curate
Died 6 Nov 1867, buried in Borobdge Church Yard Monday 11 Nov 1867

General histories etc:
“Records of a Yorkshire Manor” by Sir Thos Lawson Tancred 1937   [cf JRS family & friends]
Petition to Parliament 1830, by Andrew Lawson and Wm A Mackinnon
alleges that Newcastle, by means of Hirst, controlled the election.  “The said Postmaster, being there employed in receiving collecting and managing the revenue of the Post Office at the said Borough, illegally and unconstitutionally interfered in procuring the Precept for the Election of the said Borough, and in the Election of the person who was to preside at the Election for the said Borough as returning Officer, and the Uncle of the said Postmaster and Agent of the said Peer was nominated to be the Assessor at the said Election, and the Brother in law* of the said Postmaster and Agent of the said Peer was nominated to be the Poll Clerk”
*? Thos Stubbs??

Mrs Mary STUBBS of BOROUGHBRIDGE
daughter of John Henlock of Great Ouseburn (1769-1829) and Jane Redmayne of Austwick
1803-91. 
Mother of Jane, Joe, Tom, John, Alice & Lizzy.  

Diary references:
12 Mar 1859:  “Mrs Clark of Ellenthorp Hall was confined   child dead  Mother was there”
1 Apr 1859:  “At noon Mother & I drove down to call on Mr & Mrs Edwin Clark & Miss Ellen & Miss Lucy Hallewell”
8 Jun 1859:  “In the afternoon I drove Mother to Little Ouseburn  called at the Lascelles’ & went on to tea at Uncle Wms”
1 Aug 1859:  “At night Tom & I drove to Skelton   Mother  Capes & Jane & Mary Hirst had been there at tea”
27 Nov 1859:  “Mother was at Langthorp all day as Joes baby was ill in the whooping cough”

9 Feb 1860:  “Wrote to Bessie Carass & to Mother”
13 Feb 1860:  “Wrote to Mother”
    also writes to Mother twice more in May, and once in April
27 May 1860:  “Mother went to Uncle Picks tonight”
4 Jul 1860:  “I drove Mother to Knaresbro”
7 Aug 1860:  “... tea with Uncle Pick  Joe Sarah & Mother came on in the afternoon”
29 Aug 1860:  “Father & Mother & Dora Hirst went to Redcar at noon”
26 Sep 1860:  “Father & Mother came home from Redcar”
11 Oct 1860:  “Father & Mother were just returning from Knaresbro as we started home”
29 Oct 1860:  “Mother went to Scarbro to stay with the Redmaynes”

Memorial Inscriptions:
The choir vestry of Boroughbridge church was erected in her memory by her family

Alice Stubbs’ Bible:
Married Gt Ouseburn church 21 Sep 1824 by the Rev FB Emmett, curate
Died 6 May 1891 buried in Borobridge Church Yard Friday 9 May

TDHS notes:
She was born 16 Nov 1803

Notes
The purported holographic Will of her mother, Jane (Redmayne) Henlock, made at Taitlands 8 Dec 1843, and amended by a Codicil the same day, shows that she was to receive a “mourning ring marked Ann Redmayne”.  The estate went to her unmarried sisters.

Order of Service of dedication of new Choir Vestry given by her family in memory of Mary Stubbs, on 20 Nov 1892       
MS notes of the address given at the dedication by Rev Canon Owen 20 Nov 1892:     
“The consistent lover of our Church in whose memory our new choir vestry has been dedicated, was, throughout my long residence in this parish, one of my most steadfast and consistent friends.  I valued her friendship very highly ... [speaks of her faith] ...  The choir vestry was erected as a Memorial to the Mother, because the members of her family well knew how strong was her attachment to, and delight in, the holy services within these walls. - For the erection of our little church she, and the members of her family, jealously laboured and liberally contributed - and, as I believe, herself sought to be a living stone in the Temple of the Lord .... ”

Joseph STUBBS of Boroughbridge
1829-1906. 
Brother of John

Diary references: eg
    entries from Jan 1856 onwards:  goes out with Joe, walks, rows etc with Joe, borrows Joe’s     mare, has dinner at Joe & Sarah’s, walks with them &c
29 Jan 1856:  “After tea went again to Carrass’ with Joe  had a rubber at wist  Uncle Hirst came for Sophy    Joe & I got out at the back door & went to the Newsroom”
2 Feb 1856:  “At Night I set Joe to Station on his way to York”
16 Feb 1856:  “At Night I went to Ouseburn for Joe about some oilcake”
23 Feb 1856:  “At Night saw Uncle & Aunt Pick off home, took Aunt Bell to Uncle Hirsts’ was examining the business books with Joe in his counting house”
1 Mar 1856:  “At Night Joe & I were busy with Fathers books”
5 Mar 1856:  “At Night I was home with Joe chopping Sugar &c”
8 Mar 1856:  “At Night Joe & I had a walk down towards Ellenthorpe   I then helped him to post & make up his books &c”
14 Mar 1856:  “Richd Walburn of Norton was buried today   Joe & Father both went”
17 Mar 1856:  “...went to meet train.....Joe brot my new morning suit”
5 Apr 1856:  “At Night I had a walk nearly to Ellenthorp with Joe & then helped him to post the books”
29 Apr 1856:  “At Night  Capes  Joe & I rowed their boat up to Roecliffe for the first time & back”
30 Apr 1856:  “Went also with Joe to Charlotte Farmerys to ask her to let them anchor the boat of her field end”
19 Sep 1856:  “At Noon Joe & I went to the Malt Shovel   had a glass of beer”
29 Sep 1856:  “At Noon Joe & I fetched the boat from the Steam Mill & came over the dam & through the Arch   the river was very high”
11 Oct 1856:  “Went to Station to see Joe off to Redcar”
13 Nov 1856:  “At Noon was about home   Joe shot 2 sparrows”
15 Nov 1856:  “At night I helped Joe with his books”
25 Nov 1856:  “At Night Joe & I walked to see Aunt Hirsts cow which they were expecting to calve”
30 Nov 1856:  “We did not any of us go [to church] in the afternoon  it snowed tremendously  Joe & I sat in the Kitchen all the afternoon”
18 Dec 1856:  “Joe took Alice to York today & brought Lizzy back  who came from school today”

2 Mar 1857:  “Joe brought me a new morning suit from Evers of York”
22 Apr 1857:  “Joe slept at Langthorp tonight for the first time”
12 May 1857:  “Father & Mother  Capes & Jane set off in Mrs Morrells Cab to Joes Wedding at ½ past seven”
20 May 1857:  “Got a pickle fork Aunt Ann got in York for me to give to Joe & Sarah”
22 May 1857:  “Joe & Sarah came home”
15 Jun 1857:  “At Night Joe Capes & I went up in the boat  Slater went with us  I took a gun & Joe took one  Joe shot one rabbit  I shot one & I shot a bat  he got two pike from Slaters lines”
13 Jul 1857:  “At Night rode Joes Mare to Dishforth to get her shod”
15 Jul 1857:  “At Night went to Cookes Circus   A very fair performance   Uncle & Aunt Pick went   Joe & Sarah, Capes, Lizzie & Alice, Steele, & Smallwood”
30 Aug 1857:  “Kept house for Joe in the afternoon as he & Sarah were both at Redcar”
9 Sep 1857:  “Dined with Joe & Sarah off a brace of grouse”
13 Sep 1857:  “Had tea at Joes  Kept house for him & let Sarah & him go to Church”
7 Oct 1857:  “The Fast Day   Joe  Sarah & I drove to Ripon  Heard the Bishop preach”
5 Dec 1857:  “At Night Smallwood & I walked to Station  saw Joe & Sarah off to York from whence they were going to Faxfleet Hall on Monday”

19 Jul 1858:  [Tom, at Liverpool] “saw us off by the 3.50 train   we brought a very large dog for Joe”

11 May 1859:  “with Capes to H E Clarks to tea to meet the usual rook shooting party ... Joe Capes Charlesworth & I walked home together”
14 May 1859:  “At Noon Steele  Capes Joe & I went to Chr Lofthouses stable to see a corpse which was found in the Canal”
4 Sep 1859:  “Joes wife brot forth her first born son today”
13 Oct 1859:  “to Langthorp to sup with Sarah   Joe was at Redcar”
15 Nov 1859:  “At night Capes & Jane  Joe & Sarah  Aunt Bell Charlesworth  Miss Ruth Stott Steele & his sister went in Morrells omnibus to Thos Lunds to a party  played cards  charades &c & a very pleasant evening we had”
27 Dec 1859:  “had tea & supper at Hy Carasses with Joe Lizzie & Alice & Eliz Stubbs”
   
In 1860, J walks with Joe, visits Joe & Sarah’s, goes on the river with him and on visits &c

20 Dec 1860:  “In the afternoon Joe & I took the gun to Langthorp Field & shot a waterhen”
25 Dec 1860:  “Joe Sarah & Lilley dined with us”

Sarah died 22 Feb 1887, Joe died 18 Dec 1906 “has been long ill”

Alice Stubbs’ Bible:
Born 30 Jan 1829 at 9 am

Notes
Children:
Mary Elizabeth Stubbs     b 5 Apr 1858
Joseph William Stubbs    b 4 Sep 1859    marr Miss Isabel Maud Calder, daughter of Rev Wm Calder, at Kingston on Thames 9 Jun 1898
Thomas Buttery Henlock Stubbs b 18 Oct 1872

George Whitehead’s Journals:
Mr Joseph Stubbs Spirit Merchant & Grocer Bbdge sold his stock in trade &c  Jun 5th & 6th   he is giving up the business    1893
Mr Joseph Stubbs Bbdge burried Decbr 27 aged 77 1906

Lillie: Kellys 1908, Stubbs, Miss L, New Row

Sarah SEDGWICK of York (wife of Joseph Stubbs of Boroughbridge)
d 1887
Diary references:  frequent cf also Joe
6 Aug 1856:  “Wrote to Tom   & Sarah Sedgwick to thank her for helping Joe to choose a present for me to give to Jane”
8 Sep 1856:  “Joe & Sarah came from York”
1 Oct 1856:  “At Noon Father Mother  Aunt Redmayne & Uncle   & Aunt Bell & Sarah Sedgwick went to Redcar...”
2 Oct 1856:  “My birthday   Joe gave me a blue necktie which Sarah had given him for me”
19 Oct 1856:  “[at Redcar]  Sarah  Aunt & I went to Coatham [church] at night”
15 Nov 1857:  “...to Bbdge [church] at night   Sarah had a half sort of fainting fit & I had to lead her out”  [she would be about 4 ½ months pregnant]

2 Jan 1859:  “Joe spent the day with us   Sarah was in York”
15 Jul 1859:  “At night  John Scholfield  Joe & Sarah  Tom & I were boating”
4 Sep 1859:  “Joes wife brot forth her first born son today”
13 Oct 1859:  “At night went to Langthorp to sup with Sarah   Joe was at Redcar”
27 Nov 1859:  “Mother was at Langthorp all day as Joes baby was ill in the whooping cough”
   
In 1860, J walks with Sarah, writes to her from London, goes on the river with her, to Knaresbro &c.   She visits Woolpots with the children
   
Miss Stamper stays at Joe & Sarah’s, and so does Capes

IGI:
a possible baptismal entry for Sarah in Mbro Ref Library IGI is:
Sedgwick, Sarah
dau: of Leonard Wm Sedgwick & Elizabeth, bap 5 Dec 1833 at St Olave’s, York

Children:
Mary Elizabeth Stubbs  (Lillie) b 5 Apr 1858
Joseph William Stubbs (Willie) b 4 Sep 1859; marr Miss Isabel Maud Calder, daughter of Rev Wm Calder, at Kingston on Thames 9 Jun 1898
Thomas Buttery Henlock Stubbs (Tom) b 18 Oct 1872

Joe refers to her as Sally in a letter
Sarah quite suddenly died “of a stoppage of the bowels” on 22 Feb 1887 aged 53 or 54. 

Jane STUBBS (CAPES) of Boroughbridge, Knaresborough, Pannal
1826-1903
Sister of John
cf Capes

Thomas STUBBS of Boroughbridge, Liverpool and London
Brother of John.  1834-66
Diary references:
5 Aug 1857:  “Uncle   Aunt   Tom & I went to Manchester   spent the day in the Exhibition & most superb it was...”
6 Aug 1857:  “Spent the Day in Liverpool   went to Toms office........”

10 Jul 1858:  “Sd & I set off to Liverpool en route to Wales...Tom met us”
11 Jul 1858:  “Tom & we went to the church for the blind.  Went to Toms lodgings to see his 2 dogs”
19 Jul 1858:  “..Tom went to his office & returned to us at the Stork..”

11 Jul 1859:  “A P.O.Surveyor came about the £5 sent to Tom which was lost”
13 Jul 1859:  “Tom came today”  [they spend most days together - boating, shooting, to Charlesworths, HE Clarks, L Sedgwicks, Aunt Bells, Ouseburn &c]
20 Jul 1859:  “At night Tom & I went ... to Aldbro to take Lizzy & Alice & Mary & Sophy Hirst home”
29 Jul 1859:  “At night Tom  Aunt Bell Lizzie  Alice & I went to Leonards to tea”
1 Aug 1859:  “At night Tom & I drove to Skelton   Mother  Capes & Jane & Mary Hirst had been there at tea”
4 Aug 1859:  “At noon Tom left for Liverpool & Lizzie went to Taitlands”

 In 1860, J sees Tom in London, where he appears to be lodging with Tom Sedgwick at Kingsland.  They sometimes spend a Sunday together.  J lends Tom £3 in March, and passes him his half of Aunt Ann Pick’s ham.  Tom goes to the Derby.  When Tom visits Bbdge from 21 Jul to 6 Aug, J spends most days with him

Parish Registers:  Boroughbridge
13 Jul 1834 Thomas, son of Thomas & Mary Stubbs, wine merchant baptised   
with the notes “Private” and “christened 14 August 1834” written alongside

Alice Stubbs’ Bible:
Born 9 Jul 1834 at 10:30pm.  Died London 10 Jan 1866.  Buried 13 Jan in Highgate Cemetery, grave numbered 14398.

Notes
Tom was working in Liverpool in 1857.  A small book “A Present from an Apprentice...The Gift of the Worshipful Company of Vintners” seems to have been given to him by J K Hooper Esq, Alderman, his master, in 1850.

Mary Elizabeth “Lizzy”  STUBBS (DUNHILL) of BOROUGHBRIDGE and Doncaster
1842-?1914       
Sister of John

Diary references:
24 Jan 1853:  “snowed fast in afternoon    went to Ouseburn to fetch Alice & LIzzy”

5 Feb 1856:  “Drove Jane & Lizzy to Starbeck   went by train to Arthington took a Cab from there to Ilkley to Miss Adcock’s    Had dinner there.  Stayed till 3 o’clock.  Left Lizzy there & Jane & I returned.  Met there Miss Harriet Dykes the nicest looking young lady I have seen of some time   I also liked Miss Adcock”
19 Jun 1856:  “Lizzy came home”
5 Aug 1856:  “Lizzy went to School to day”
15 Sep 1856:  “Uncle   Mary & Lizzy left us”
3 Nov 1856:  “...Had a letter from Lizzy”
4 Nov 1856:  “...Wrote to Lizzie...”
18 Dec 1856:  “Joe took Alice to York today & brought Lizzy back  who came from school today”

4 Feb 1857:  “At Noon Father went with Lizzy to Arthington on her way to school”
[Whites 1853:  Arthington:  “here is a station & telegraph office on the Leeds Northern Railway which crosses the valley by a handsome viaduct of 21 arches”]
19 Feb 1857:  “...Wrote to Lizzy...”
23 Feb 1857:  “...Had a letter from Lizzy...”
3 Mar 1857:  “I wrote to Tom & Lizzy”
30 Mar 1857:  “...Had letter from Lizzy”
7 Apr 1857:  “Wrote to Lizzy & Mary Redmayne”
1 Jun 1857:  “...Had note from Lizzy”
15 Jul 1857:  “At Night went to Cookes Circus   A very fair performance   Uncle & Aunt Pick went   Joe & Sarah, Capes, Lizzie & Alice, Steele, & Smallwood”
28 Jul 1857:  “Lizzie   Alice & I went in [Uncle Wm’s] pony carriage to Ouseburn”

4 Feb 1858:  “Alice & Lizzy went to School today”
17 Jun 1858:  “Alice & Lizzie came home today”
25 Jun 1858:  “Mr & Mrs Workman left us   they took Lizzie & Alice with them”
7 Aug 1858:  “Lizzie & Alice & Mary Redmayne went to School.  Uncle Redmayne went with them on his way to Taitlands”
17 Dec 1858:  “Lizzie & Alice came home today”
20 Dec 1858:  “Supped with Joe & Sarah  Capes & Jane  Lizzy & Alice at Aunt Bells”
30 Dec 1858:  “At Night went to Capes   Miss D  Miss Sarah Appleton of Dishforth  Miss Clarke of Minskip  Miss Calder  Jane Sedgwick & Mary  Alice & Lizzy  Joe & I were there   got home about ten”

3 Jan 1859:  “At night went with Miss Stott, Steele & EC Clark  in Stotts phaeton to Clarks of Minskip to tea   Miss Calder  The Misses Appleton & Miss McCleod were there  Had a good dance  John Clark drove the Sedgwicks & Alice & Lizzy & me home  got home about 12”
3 Feb 1859:  “At Noon Lizzy & Alice went to school”
20 Jul 1859:  “At night Tom & I went ... to Aldbro to take Lizzy & alice & Mary & Sophy Hirst home”
23 Jul 1859:  “...called at Clarks of Minskip for Lizzy & Alice  Mary & Sophy Hirst & John Scholfield”
29 Jul 1859:  “At night Tom  Aunt Bell Lizzie  Alice & I went to Leonards to tea”
4 Aug 1859:  “At noon Tom left for Liverpool & Lizzie went to Taitlands”
27 Sep 1859:  “Uncle brot Lizzie who had been staying at the Terrace home with him”
1 Oct 1859:  “I walked to Settle to fetch Lizzie who stayed all last night at the Terrace”
3 Oct 1859:  “Uncle [Redmayne] went to Clapham Fair    Aunt   Henry  Lizzie & I went to Clapham in the large carriage   I drove there  We had dinner & tea at Miss Redmaynes   Called at the vicarage & Miss Ingleby’s & had some good fun in the fair  Hy Marriner was at home”
17 Dec 1859:  “Lizzie came home from Taitlands   She came to Knaresbro yesterday”
27 Dec 1859:  “had tea & supper at Hy Carasses with Joe Lizzie & Alice & Eliz Stubbs”

    Lizzie is at home in 1860.  J mentions writing to her from London.  She goes on the river, stays with family on visits, goes to parties etc

Slaters 1854: Ilkley: (academies & schools) Adcock, Ann (boarding)  Ilkley Hall

Parish Registers: Boroughbridge
21 Sep 1865
William Workman Dunhill, 28, bachelor, chemist, Doncaster, (father) William Dunhill, chemist, marries
Mary Elizabeth Stubbs, 22, spinster, Boroughbridge, (father) Thomas Stubbs, wine merchant
witnesses:  Frances Stubbs, Edward Mapplebeck, William Dunhill

Alice Stubbs’ Bible:
Born 28 Jul 1842 at 5:30 am.  “Sponsors:  Mr & Mrs Hirst, Mr & Mrs Redmayne”
Married William Workman Dunhill of Arksey/Doncaster 21 Sep 1865 at St James Church, Boroughbridge
Had children:  Mary b 18 Jun 1867, and Edith b 6 Aug 1868
William Workman Dunhill died 20 Aug 1887

Notes
Mary Dunhill married Henry Ingledew Daggett, Surgeon, Bbdge, and had children:  Ethel Ingledew, William Ingledew & Ruth Ingledew Daggett

Alice STUBBS of BOROUGHBRIDGE
1844-1921
Sister of John
Diary references:
24 Jan 1853:  “snowed fast in afternoon    went to Ouseburn to fetch Alice & LIzzy”

27 Mar 1856:  “Cousin Bessie Stamper  Father & Mama went to Helperby to fetch Alice   they retd to dinner.  At Night went to Aunt Bells......I played with Mary Jane Baldwin & Alice in the Kitchen....”
2 Jun 1856:  “...we...took Dora & Mary Stubbs  our Alice & Anne Sedgwick a row nearly to Brampton....”
18 Dec 1856:  “Joe took Alice to York today & brought Lizzy back  who came from school today”

15 Jul 1857:  “At Night went to Cookes Circus   A very fair performance   Uncle & Aunt Pick went   Joe & Sarah, Capes, Lizzie & Alice, Steele, & Smallwood”
28 Jul 1857:  “Lizzie   Alice & I went in [Uncle Wm’s] pony carriage to Ouseburn”

4 Feb 1858:  “Alice & Lizzy went to School today”
17 Jun 1858:  “Alice & Lizzie came home today”
25 Jun 1858:  “Mr & Mrs Workman left us   they took Lizzie & Alice with them”
7 Aug 1858:  “Lizzie & Alice & Mary Redmayne went to School.  Uncle Redmayne went with them on his way to Taitlands”
17 Dec 1858:  “Lizzie & Alice came home today”
20 Dec 1858:  “Supped with Joe & Sarah  Capes & Jane  Lizzy & Alice at Aunt Bells”
30 Dec 1858:  “At Night went to Capes   Miss D  Miss Sarah Appleton of Dishforth  Miss Clarke of Minskip  Miss Calder  Jane Sedgwick & Mary  Alice & Lizzy  Joe & I were there   got home about ten”

3 Jan 1859:  “At night went with Miss Stott, Steele & EC Clark  in Stotts phaeton to Clarks of Minskip to tea   Miss Calder  The Misses Appleton & Miss McCleod were there  Had a good dance  John Clark drove the Sedgwicks & Alice & Lizzy & me home  got home about 12”
3 Feb 1859:  “At Noon Lizzy & Alice went to school”
20 Jul 1859:  “At night Tom & I went ... to Aldbro to take Lizzy & alice & Mary & Sophy Hirst home”
23 Jul 1859:  “...called at Clarks of Minskip for Lizzy & Alice  Mary & Sophy Hirst & John Scholfield”
29 Jul 1859:  “At night Tom  Aunt Bell Lizzie  Alice & I went to Leonards to tea”
3 Aug 1859:  “Alice went to School at Blackheath  she travelled with Miss Green a friend of Miss Clarks of Minskip”
16 Dec 1859:  “Alice came home from Blackheath”
27 Dec 1859:  “had tea & supper at Hy Carasses with Joe Lizzie & Alice & Eliz Stubbs”

1 Feb 1860:  “Alice & I started at ½ past 7 for London   Miss Kate Howe came with us from York   we got to Town at 4 & took a cab to 15 Cloudesley Sqre”
2 Feb 1860:  “Alice went to school”
3 Mar 1860:  “Alice & Mary Redmayne came to stay till Monday at Janes [in London]”
    She is at Jane’s again in April, but is back in Bbdge for July and leaves for London with Tom on 6 August

Kellys 1908: Stubbs, Miss Alice, St James Square

Her Bible:
Born 2 Aug 1844 at 6 am, and christened 6 Sep by the Rev Henry Armstrong.  “Sponsers:  Miss Preston, Stainforth, Mr Charles Stubbs, London, and Miss Hirst, Borobridge”

Notes
Died St James’s Square, Borobridge 23 Jul 1921, buried Wednesday 27 July.

Mrs Mary Ann STUBBS    of/in SETTLE
Daughter of William Henlock of Knaresborough and his wife Eliza, daughter of Thomas Bowes of York.  Mother of Bishop Stubbs

Born 2 Oct 1803, married William Morley Stubbs 23 Sep 1824.  Widowed 23 Aug 1842.  Died 8 June 1884, buried at Aylesbury.

Diary references:
Jan a/c 1853:  30th - [recd from] Mrs Stubbs 4/-.  A payment that day of 4/- was made to Dr Butterton
30 Sep 1853:  “School   In the evening walked with T Bramley to Taitlands on the sly   Mrs Stubbs & Co knew not”
20 Aug 1856:  “[Taitlands]  Wm Stubbs & Mrs  Miss Henlock  Fanny & Aunt Bell dined with us..”
5 Sep 1856:  “..Mrs Wm Stubbs  Aunt Bell & Aunt Redmayne & I set off to come here..[for Jane’s wedding]”
18 Sep 1856:  “...Mrs Wm Stubbs left us today...”

Census:  1851
Settle:The Terrace:
Isabella    Henlock, head, U, 45, schoolmistress, b Knaresbro
Mary Ann Stubbs, sister  W. 47,    b do.-
Frances     Stubbs,  sister’s dau, 15    pupil at home, b do.-
boarders:
Mary Jane Hardacre, 17 pupil b Long Preston
Thomas     Bramley,  15 pupil at grammar school, b Leeds
William    Skelton,  14 do.- b Leeds
Robert    Earnshaw, 14 do.-,  b Colne, Lancs
Henry L    Hunter,  nephew, 10,  do.- b Wetherby
Edward N Harrison 12    do.- b West Indies, Jamaica
William H Harrison 10    do.-    do.-           
   
Agnes Noble, servant W  28, household servant    b Giggleswick
Eliz. Burniston, do.  U 16 do.- b Long Preston

Notes
It's clear from John's diaries that Mrs Stubbs assisted her sister in running of the boarding house/school.  “Picturesque History of Yorkshire” by J S Fletcher pub ca1899 states that the Bishop went “to Giggleswick School and thence to Oxford”, but the biography of the Bishop glosses over this period of his life, does not mention that his mother kept a school and his sister went out as a governess and simply states that he went to Ripon Grammar school and then Oxford. 

Miss Frances STUBBS  of/in SETTLE
Sister of the Bishop
Born 30 Mar 1836, died 16 Jun 1877, buried at Ramsgate  [Bp S p 74]

Diary references:
15 Aug 1856:  “[Taitlands]..I then drove Fanny Stubbs  Sophy Hirst & Jane R Junr in the phaeton”
18 Aug 1856:  “...After tea we all walked to Castleberg   Fanny told me of her smash with George Robinson..”
20 Aug 1856: “Wm Stubbs & Mrs   Miss Henlock  Fanny & Aunt Bell dined with us...”
13 Jan 1858:  “...Fanny Stubbs met us at Settle Station...”
14 jan 1858:  “Miss Nixon  Mary Redmayne  Mary Sedgwick  Fanny Stubbs & Margaret Ingelby were bridesmaids..”
8 Jul 1858:  “met the Sedgwicks  Fanny & Mary Ann Stubbs Walter Hills  Joe  Sarah  & Aunt Bell at Uncle Hirsts”
22 Jul 1858:  “Fanny Stubbs came to stay with us today”
11 Aug 1858:  “Fanny Stubbs went home today”  [had also stayed at Ouseburn and with Capes]

1 Oct 1859:  “...walked to Settle to fetch Lizzie who stayed all last night at the Terrace.  Miss Sweet & Fanny set us part of the way home”
11 Oct 1859:  “ ... dined & had tea at the Terrace   called with Fanny at Mrs Sweets”

Censuses:
1851:  Settle:  The Terrace
with her aunt Miss Isabella Henlock, her mother Mary Ann Stubbs, 6 boarders & her cousin Henry Hunter:
Stubbs    Frances    , sister’s dau, U, 15, pupil at home, b Knaresbro

Ann STUBBS of/in LONDON
Diary references:
22 Jan 1856:    “Uncle Hirst & Dora came home from London & Ann Stubbs came with them”
27 Jan 1856:    “[to church]  Ann Stubbs went with us.  She then went & had tea at the B.  Foot & I took her home after Church”
11 Feb 1856:    “I set Ann Stubbs who was at our house home to Uncles...”
14 Feb 1856:    “...I went to meet the train  Sophy & Ann Stubbs came up from Brafferton..”
21 Feb 1856:    “...we then went to meet the train expectg Alfred Cresswell to fetch Ann Stubbs from Uncles but he did not arrive...”
22 Feb 1856:    “..after Church came round the town with Joe & Alfred Cresswell who had come to fetch Ann Stubbs”

26 Oct 1859:  “At night Ann Stubbs of London & Mary Hirst had tea at the Bridge Foot”

    In Feb 1860, J sees Alice Stubbs at Jane Stubbs’ house in London

Notes
?This would appear to be Anne, daughter of William Alwin Stubbs & Sophia Rivers, b 1842, d 1870
Her father’s aunt, Ann, married Henry Hulbert, and her daughter Sophia married George Cresswell.  Alfred was their son.

Elizabeth STUBBS   
daughter of Jane Hirst, "Mrs Charles".
b1845

Diary references:
24 Nov 1856:    “...Took Elizth Stubbs home from Capes’s...”

27 Dec 1859:  “had tea & supper at Hy Carasses with Joe Lizzie & Alice & Eliz Stubbs”

On 29 Sep 1896, Jane Elizabeth Stubbs married Alexander Smith Bell of Edinburgh at Saltburn – it was her 51st birthday.  [Bishop Stubbs' history gives her name as Je Elizabeth]  Unfortunately there is no mention of this in John’s diary, but his son Duncan left a note of the marriage in his papers. 
Elizabeth is only mentioned twice in the 1853-60 diaries.  In November and December 1856, when she was eleven years old, she stayed in Boroughbridge and John mentions taking her home from the Capes’ house and having tea and supper with her, Lizzie, Alice and Joe at the Carass’ house.

Eliza STUBBS (GWYNN)           
1827-78
Sister of Bishop William Stubbs
married Thomas Gwynn M.A. of Christ Church, who d1874, had daughter Gertrude Mary Gwynn (1859-92) cf Bishop Stubbs p73

Diary references:
12 Jan 1857:    “Eliza Stubbs  Dora Hirst & Aunt Bell dined with us”
17 Jan 1857:    “Father went to Taitlands today   as he was going to Eliza Stubbs Wedding”

Jane HIRST, wife of Charles Stewart STUBBS   (“MRS CHARLES”)   
of 15 Cloudesley Square, London
b1824, marr 1844
Daughter of William & Elizabeth Hirst, widow of Charles Stewart Stubbs
cf Bishop Stubbs p72

Diary references:
12 May 1856    “Sophy H  Jane Stubbs Joe  Capes & I we went & rowed up as far as Slaters”
12 Jun 1856:    “went...to the Station to meet Uncle, Jane Stubbs, Mary Hirst, Cook & the Children who came from London to night..”
15 Jun 1856:    “Joe  Capes  Richd Hirst  Dora  Mrs Charles   Willey & I went to Roecliffe in the Afternoon”
4 Jul 1856:    “...Richd Hirst  Mr Capes  Dora & Mrs Charles came to tea..”
14 Jul 1856:    “At Night Dora & I walked to meet Mrs Charles & Sophy coming from Burton..”
22 Jul 1856:    “..At Night I drove Mrs Charles Stubbs & Miss Isabella Sutcliffe who was staying at our house to Ouseburn in Uncle’s dogcart”
30 Jul 1856:    “Uncle Hirst  Dora & Mrs Charles set off with Mr & Mrs Roger Buttery to the Lakes   they drove”
8 Aug 1856:    “Uncle Hirst  Mrs Charles & Dora returned from the Lakes”
15 Sep 1856:    “At Night I had a walk with Mrs Charles & Mary nearly to Gibbet Hill”
18 Sep 1856:    “Walked at Noon with Mrs Charles & Mary Hirst to the top of Gibbet  it was a beautiful day  we had a grand view”
20 Aug 1857:    “At Night Sophy  Dora  Mrs Charles  Mrs Joe & the Two Sedgwicks had tea at our house”
18 Sep 1857:    “Aunt Hirst  Mrs Charles  Dora & the children came from Redcar today”
25 Sep 1857:    “Mrs Charles  Mary Hirst & Sophy supped with us”
28 Sep 1857:    “Mrs Charles S & Co went home today”
26 Jun 1858:    “Fletcher & Mrs Chas Stubbs drove with me to Starbeck”
30 Sep 1858:    “...At noon Father & Mother came from Redcar also Uncle Hirst & Mrs Chas Stubbs and the corpse [Aunt Hirst’s] came by Ripon..”
19 Oct 1858:  “went with Aunt Bell to Capes’ & brought Mrs Charles Stubbs back”
22 Oct 1858:  “Mrs Charles & Alice went to London today”

28 Jul 1859:  “Uncle Hirst  Dora & Mrs Chas started for Wales”
6 Aug 1859:  “Mary Hirst went to Wales today  Uncle & Mrs Chas returned home”
23 Aug 1859:  “At night I drove Mrs Charles & Sophy to Norton”
26 Aug 1859:  “Mrs Powell  the Misses Appleton  Mrs Chas  Sophie & Uncle were at our house at tea”

In 1860, J arrives at Jane’s in Islington with Alice on Feb 1.  Jane helps him find lodgings in Islington, and he calls at her house most days while he is in London.  He meets Mrs STEWART STUBBS there on Apr 4

Bishop Stubbs p72, with additions from note of “descendants of Thos Stubbs of Borobridge the elder”:   
Jane Hirst b 21 Nov 1824, married Charles Stewart Stubbs 12 Dec 1844.  They had three children: 
1. William b 9 Dec 1846, married Fanny, daughter of James Thompson, niece of Wm Thompson (who married Sophy Hirst)
Wm & Fanny had children:  Winifred, Dora & William Hirst Stubbs 
2. Jane Elizabeth b 29 Sep 1845, married 29 Sep 1896 Alexander Smith Bell of Edinburgh, at Saltburn, (no issue & no mention in JRS diary)       
3. Alice Charles, b 30 Mar 1848, married Rev John Luce, and had a large family

Charles Stewart Stubbs was killed riding in the Park in London on 31 Jan 1848, three months before the birth of Alice.  It is this Alice who is presumably referred to 22.10.58

By the time of the 1881 Census Jane Charles had retired to Hillsborough Lawn, Cranham Road, Cheltenham.  She had by then inherited the considerable amount of money left to her by her father, who died in 1879.  The Census shows that her eldest daughter Jane Elizabeth (known as Elizabeth) aged 35 was unmarried and living with her mother, and that they had a visitor, a cook and a housemaid. 
There is no note of Jane Charles’ death, but on 29 Sep 1896, Jane Elizabeth Stubbs married Alexander Smith Bell of Edinburgh at Saltburn – it was her 51st birthday.  [Bishop Stubbs' history gives her name as Je Elizabeth]  Unfortunately there is no mention of this in John’s diary, but his son Duncan left a note of the marriage in his papers.  Elizabeth is only mentioned twice in the 1853-60 diaries.  In November and December 1856, when she was eleven years old, she stayed in Boroughbridge and John mentions taking her home from the Capes’ house and having tea and supper with her, Lizzie, Alice and Joe at the Carass’ house.

Alice Charles STUBBS of London
daughter of Jane Hirst and Charles Stewart Stubbs
Alice Charles Stubbs was born in 1848, after her father’s death.  She was five years younger than John’s sister Alice and is only a child during the 1853-60 diaries. 
Her character is much more apparent in the letters of the 1870s, and John seems to have been drawn closer to her by the fact that she was the same age as his wife and they became friends. 

Alice at the age of 24 was engaged to a young clergyman, John Luce, who was born in Jersey.  When he got a curacy at Cheltenham in March 1872 they were able to announce their marriage, which took place on 9 April.  Alice’s grandfather Hirst and aunt Dora went to London for the wedding, and came back to say in the words of Alice to Ellis “everything passed off splendidly but poor old Cookey was so ill in the house they almost feared her living over the day but happily she did but we have not heard since whether she is alive or not.  We had a letter from Alice herself yesterday written in capital spirits and saying she had so enjoyed the wedding day   she got loads of presents they say”.  Alice and John Luce came up to Boroughbridge that summer to see the family and stayed a month or so – he preached twice one Sunday in September, “very good sermons” according to Mary Stubbs.  They apparently had a large family – four children aged 1, 2, 4 and 6 are listed in the 1881 Census, and from the letters we can see that within three years of marriage two babies had been born. 
On 24 Apr 1875 Mary wrote that “Willie Stubbs’ baby is very delicate, Alice Luce’s a very fat one”, and on 3 Jul 1875 that “we had Alice Luce and her two babies to spend a day last week they are nice children the eldest very quick and amusing”. 
After a few years in Cheltenham they moved to 47 London Road, Gloucester, where the parish seems to have been that of St John Baptist.  The 1881 Census shows them both aged 33, with the young family and two young men of 20 and 22 as boarders, both accountants.  They had two housemaids, a cook and a nurse, all aged between 16 and 21 – it must have been a lively household. 

Mrs Stewart STUBBS of London

Mary Elizabeth Alder, the wife of Revd Stewart Dixon Stubbs (b1832).  (His second wife, married in 1873, was Jane Harrison) [Bp Stubbs p69]

The Revd Stewart Dixon Stubbs was a younger brother of Charles Stewart Stubbs, husband of  Jane Hirst.  They were two of the sons (it was a large family) of Joseph Stubbs (1790-1864) & Sophia Judith Dixon. 
Joseph was the cousin of Thomas Stubbs of Boroughbridge (1761-1838); his father William, brother of Thomas Stubbs of Ripley (1735-1805) had left Yorkshire for London in the C18.
There was still a good deal of contact between the London Stubbs and the Boroughbridge Stubbs, as witness the marriage of Jane and Charles.  John also knew Emily, daughter of John Dixon Stubbs (b1824), who married George Augustus Carter Evans.

John met Mrs Stewart Stubbs in Islington in 1860

Mary STUBBS of/in LONDON
Diary references: [during her visit 20 May - 11 Jun, includes:-]
20 May 1856:    “Miss Mary Stubbs of London & a Miss Dixon from Clapham Surrey came to stay at Uncles”
21 May 1856:    “At Night Joe  Capes Jim Sedgwick & I rowed up to Bickerdikes in the boat  Miss Mary Stubbs of London  Miss Dickson (Genl Dickson’s daur) Sophy H  Mary Sedg  our Jane  Alice & Willie Stubbs   it was very jolly”
22 May 1856:     “had a walk with [Uncle Hirst’s] Ladies up to Aldbro”
24 May 1856:    “At Night was with the Ladies at Uncle Hirst’s singing...”
29 May 1856:    “Drove Mary Stubbs & Dora to Dishforth...”
31 May 1856:    “drove Mary Stubbs & Dora to Humberton to call...”
2 Jun 1856:    “we then took Dora & Mary Stubbs  our Alice & Anne Sedgwick a row nearly to Brampton..”
3 Jun 1856:    “drove Dora & Mary Stubbs to Helperby..”
6 Jun 1856:    “Sophy  Miss Dixon & I drove to Studley  Fletcher drove Dora & Mary Stubbs..”
11 Jun 1856:    “...felt very dull all day without the Londoners”

Notes
Presumably Mary Stubbs, dau: of Joseph & Sophia Stubbs (cf Bishop Stubbs p69), and sister-in-law to Mrs Charles.  She was born 1818 and died 1901.  Her mother was a Miss Dixon; possibly the lady accompanying her to Borobdge is a relation


Mary Ann STUBBS (MRS HILLS)   
Sister of Bishop Stubbs
1838-1878
marr Walter Alfred Hills M.A. of Trinity College, Oxford 1858: children: Laura Maud, Florence Sara, Lilla Marian, Henry Maurice and Margaret Emilie

Diary references:
18 Aug 1856:    “Fanny told me of her smash with George Robinson & she also told me of Mary Anne’s Engagemt with Walter Alfred Hill Esq”
8 Jul 1858:  “met the Sedgwicks  Fanny & Mary Ann Stubbs Walter Hills  Joe  Sarah  & Aunt Bell at Uncle Hirsts”


Bishop William STUBBS of Oxford 
John's cousin
1825-1901
marr Catherine Dellar: large family

Diary references:
30 Jun 1856:    “At night Dora Sophy & I sent Wm Stubbs to Minskip  he was going to dine at Davies’”
3 Jul 1856:    “In the morning I drove Wm Stubbs to Ripon  Mary Hirst was with him  we just dropped him & then returned”
4 Jul 1856:    “Wm Stubbs & Uncle Hirst dined with us & Richd Hirst”
7 Jul 1856:    “walked to Dishforth to fetch home Uncle Hirst’s ladies & Wm Stubbs”
10 Jul 1856:    “At night Uncle Hirsts ladies  Wm Stubbs Joe & I rowed up to Westwick...”
20 Aug 1856:    [at Taitlands] “Wm Stubbs & Mrs  Miss Henlock  Fanny & Aunt Bell dined with us”
14 Jan 1858:    “Tom Sedgwick  I  Wm Stubbs  Wm Nixon & Hy Redmayne were Groomsmen”

General histories etc:
“Picturesque History of Yorkshire” by JS Fletcher, date possibly 1899
p 35    “present Bishop of Oxford whose father was a solicitor in the town was born here in 1825.....received his first education at the Grammar School, from whence he proceeded to Giggleswick School and thence to Oxford”
    “The house in which Dr Stubbs was born is that standing over Lambert Passage”

William STUBBS of London
"Willie" or "Willey"
1847-1919.  Son of Mrs Charles Stubbs

Diary references:
11 May 1856:    “Twice to BB Church  once to Roecliffe with Mr Capes  Richd  Dora & Willey”
21 May 1856:    “At Night Joe  Capes Jim Sedgwick & I rowed up to Bickerdikes in the boat  Miss Mary Stubbs of London  Miss Dickson (Genl Dickson’s daur) Sophy H  Mary Sedg  our Jane  Alice & Willie Stubbs   it was very jolly”
15 Jun 1856:    “Joe  Capes  Richd Hirst  Dora  Mrs Charles   Willey & I went to Roecliffe in the Afternoon”
1 Oct 1856:    “Cousin Jane  Sophy  Willey & Alice went to London this morning.”
25 Sep 1857:    “At Night  Smallwood  Willey Stubbs & I walked up to Kirby Hill...”

In 1860 in London, J goes sightseeing with Willey, to church with him on various occasions, and fishing with him in Bbdge in August

The Lawyers Companion & Diary 1876:
London:  Stubbs, William     31 doughty-street, mecklenburgh-square       
& as a London agent to Hirst & Capes

Notes
He married Fanny Thompson, niece of the William Thompson who married Sophy Hirst [p72 Bp Stubbs]

Willie Stubbs became a solicitor and married Fanny Thompson, the niece of his aunt Sophy’s husband William.  They were married on 3 Apr 1873 in Bridlington, which indicates that Fanny’s father was the Mr Thompson of Bridlington Quay who attended Sophy’s wedding and preached at Boroughbridge Church the following Sunday.  Willie’s cousin Charles, son of John Dixon Stubbs, was best man – he spent a day or two with Mary and Alice on his way back from Bridlington and told them how his uncle the Rev Stewart Stubbs “who promised to marry them  missed the train  so took a special one and got there just in time, but think of the expense” as Mary said.  Willie and his wife went to the Isle of Wight for their honeymoon and made their home in London.  Within months Fanny was dangerously ill, and Willie had telegraphed to his spinster aunt Mary Hirst to go to nurse her.  At the beginning of October they came up to Boroughbridge to stay, “I have not yet seen them,” wrote Mary, “but she is looking sadly delicate they say, I must go to see her today if I can but it is raining at present.”  “Willie and his wife are still here   she is very delicate and I think will make him soon look an old man” wrote Aunt Bell on 6 October, a few days later.  Two months later, more disasters – “Poor Willie Stubbs is laid up in measles are they not unfortunate his wife is a little better but far from strong   if you can at any time help him in business pray dear John do   for it is a duty for us to help each other as far as we can and Uncle is always good to you” wrote Mary on 6 Dec 1873.  In spring 1875 Fanny had her first baby – “Willie Stubbs’ baby is very delicate” wrote Mary.  This was Winifred.  Duncan Stubbs noted the children’s names as Winifred, Dora and William Hirst Stubbs – the Stubbs One Name Society has Winifred b 1875, Hilda Mary b1878 and Dorothy Gertrude 1879-1911.  However in a letter dated 8 Apr 1876 Mary wrote, “William Stubbs is gone  he was very nice as usual but they have had a trying winter  the children all in hooping cough but are now improving   he begins to look a much older man” which suggests there were children who died.  In 1880 she wrote, “Willie Stubbs has been down for a day or two   he is looking very well again  but gives a dreadful account of the health in London from the fogs”.  In the 1881 Census he, Fanny, Winifred, Hilda and Dora were living at 18 John Street in St Andrew Holborn parish – not far from Grays Inn.  He was London agent for his northern relations, and his office was in Doughty Street, Mecklenburgh Square WC1.  (John Street turns into Doughty Street at the end farthest from Grays Inn)

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