Saturday, 27 April 2013

The family of George Langborne (1735-1817), son of Michael & Eleanor Langborne

George Langborne was baptised on 19 August 1735. 

On 10 Feb 1763, George married Mary Rymer of Whitby, by licence.  The entry in the register gives his occupation as Ship builder; the marriage was witnessed by Nathaniel Langborne and Michael Blackbeard.

George Langborne (1735-1817) and Mary Rymer (1733-96) had seven children:

•    Mary, born 10 Jan 1764 and buried 18 March
•    Michael (1765-90)   
•    John, born 13 March 1767 and was buried aged five on 15 Nov 1772
•    William (1768-1844)
•    Mary (1770-1804)          
•    Eleanor (1773-1804) 
•    Margaret (1774-1816)
Mary (Rymer) Langborne died on 8 Apr 1796, aged 62.  She had married at the age of 30 and had seen three of her children buried.  When she died the surviving four children were unmarried and in their twenties. 

Her husband George survived her by many years, dying in 1817.  He outlived five of his children and his granddaughter. 
His Will was proved by his son William, his nephew William Jameson and his nephew George Langborne.  His estate (gross personalty) was valued at under £8,000 and was divided into three parts: for his son William; his son-in-law William Grenside (husband of his daughter Mary); and his son-in-law Thomas Jones (widower of his daughter Margaret) and her children Thomas Rymer Jones, Mary, Edward and Eleanor.  He made further provision for his son William, who had recently bought lands and grounds in Newham Dunsley for £4,800, which had since considerably decreased in value; William was to receive money to cover the depreciation.

Brigantine (from Richard Weatherill's book)

William Langborne (1768-1844), son of George Langborne & Mary Rymer

William was born 17 May 1768. 
He married Anne Mead (born 9 Dec 1775) on 12 June 1798.
William is in the 1823 Baines' Directory as a Ship Owner living in Baxtergate.
Anne died on 21 Sep 1826 aged 50, and William on 3 Feb 1844. 
They had four children:
•    John Langborne was born 20 June 1799.  He was of ‘Fernhill’, Newholm.  He married 5 Feb 1822 Hannah Barrick.  She died on 27 Dec 1828.  The Whitby Panorama and Monthly Chronicle reported the death: “At Fernhill, Mrs Langborne, wife of Mr John Langborne, and daughter of the late Mr Thomas Barrick, Ship-builder, aged 28.” She left two very young sons, the youngest boy having died some months earlier:
o    John Medd Langborne, b 26 Feb 1823, died in Canada.  He is possibly the youth living in the house of Henry Barrick, shipbuilder, at the 1841 Census (perhaps learning his trade with his mother’s relations)
o    Thomas William Langborne, b 5 Dec 1824, d 7 Sep 1896.  Unmarried.  Probably the last of the Langbornes to be a shipowner.  He does not seem to have been a ship builder in his own name.  According to the list of shipping in Richard Weatherill's book in 1848 he held 16/24 share in the brig Ellen built by his maternal uncle Henry Barrick [1]. Thomas is to be found in the household of his uncle Henry Barrick for the 1861, 1871 and 1881 censuses.  After Henry Barrick's death he lived with Thomas Forrest, a retired master mariner, in Mulgrave Place.  Forrest was a widower; his niece Miss Mary Allot seems to have kept house for him.  Thomas Langborne left Forrest and his niece his clothing, jewellery and trinkets, with a legacy each, and asked to be buried "as near as may be" to his uncle's grave.
o    Henry Langborne, b 26 Jan 1827, bur 25 Mar 1827
•    George Langborne, b 4 July 1801, bur 18 Mar 1803
•    William Rymer Langborne, b 18 Sep 1804. He is listed as an attorney in the 1834 Directory.  He died in May 1846
•    George Langborne, b 18 Apr 1807, he is mentioned in the Will of Susannah Langborne, his uncle Nathaniel's widow, in September 1852.  He was married, and had a son born 7 Feb 1829.  It seems likely that he is the George Langborne born 1807 who gained his Master’s ticket in Feb 1852.

Mary Langborne (1770-1804), daughter of George Langborne & Mary Rymer

Mary was born 3 Sep 1770.  She married William Grenside, a surgeon, on 26 Jan 1804.  Baines' Directory 1823 gives his address as 10 New Buildings, along the road from the well-known Dr Loy.  This address was later known as St Hilda's Terrace.  He does not appear in the 1840 Directory.  They had sons:
•    Ralph Grenside, bap 5 Dec 1804.  Clergyman in Warwickshire.
•    George Grenside, bap 10 Jan 1807.  Solicitor, lived in the Stokesley area.

Eleanor Langborne (1773-1804), daughter of George Langborne & Mary Rymer

Eleanor was born 13 Jan 1773.  She married her cousin George Langborne on 10 Dec 1801.  In 1804 their daughter was born and within a week Eleanor was dead.  She was buried in the parish churchyard on 25 November.  Their daughter:
•    Mary Ann Eleanor Langborne, baptised on 18 Nov 1804.  She died at the age of three, and was buried on 5 Jan 1808.

Margaret Langborne (1774-1816), daughter of George Langborne & Mary Rymer

Margaret was baptised 23 Nov 1774.  On 30 Nov 1808 she married Lieut Thomas Jones RN, an Excise Collector.  She died in 1816, aged 41, leaving four young children:
•    Thomas Rymer Jones (1810-80), surgeon, academic and zoologist.  A photograph of his memorial in King’s College Chapel, University of London is here
•    Mary Jones, b 27 Oct 1811, bap 29 Oct 1811
•    Edward Jones
•    Eleanor Jones

Barque (from Richard Weatherill's book)



[1]  There were two contemporary Henry Barricks, shipowners, who were known as Henry Barrick of East Side and Henry Barrick of West Side [letter A J Buchannan to H P Kendall, 31 Jan 1934].  One of the Barricks had a dry dock which was used by the Langbornes in 1838.



… next time – the family of Nathaniel Langborne (1739-1807), son of Michael & Eleanor Langborne


Wednesday, 24 April 2013

Captain Michael Langborne: Whitby privateer

In the Whitby Museum, there is a Letter of Marque granted by King George II in 1746 to Michael Langborne of Whitby.  Europe was at war and Britain required all the firepower she could find.  Captain Michael Langborne (c1703-82) was a Whitby master mariner and shipowner who was combining profit with patriotism by becoming a privateer.


His Letter of Marque entitled him “to set forth in warlike manner” in his ship, the Jane and Mary (300 tons), and apprehend, seize and take ships, vessels and goods – particularly if they were French or Spanish – and bring them to judgment in the High Court of Admiralty.  There he had to prove to the prize court that his Letter of Marque was valid and the ship he had taken belonged indeed to the enemy.  The prize court would then “condemn” it, and Captain Langborne would be able to sell the ship and he and his crew would divide the proceeds.

In addition, he was to keep a journal of his proceedings and note all the details of the prizes he took, and also
"of the station, motion and strength of the Enemys as well as he or his Mariners can discover by the best intelligence he can get … all of which he shall from time to time as he shall or may have opportunity transmit an account to our High Admiral …"
When Captain Langborne’s descendants gave the Letter of Marque to the Whitby Museum, staff at the Whitby Lit & Phil researched his family tree, which I will reproduce here, together with the later supplementary work done by Miss Grace Dixon and myself.

Michael Langborne (c1703-82) & Eleanor (c1699-1782)

Michael Langborne (c1703-82), privateer, shipowner, master of the Jane and Mary, was married to Eleanor or Ellin (c1699-1782).  They had six children, of whom the first four died in infancy:
•    William and Mary (twins), born on 29 Aug 1728 and buried 1 Sep 1728
•    Eleanor, born 4 Apr 1730 and buried 12 March 1732
•    Ellin, born 1 Dec 1732 and buried 6 Jan 1740
•    George (1735-1817)
•    Nathaniel (1739-1807)           
Eleanor was buried on 1 November 1781, aged 82.
Michael Langborne was buried on 23 May 1782, aged 79. 

Their sons George and Nathaniel survived and prospered as ship builders, and their sons after them.


Ship (from Richard Weatherill's The Ancient Port of Whitby)

Monday, 22 April 2013

People of Hutton Rudby in the C18/19: Mease to Mundale

... from my working notes ... accuracy not guaranteed ... for explanatory note, see post of 14 Feb 2013



Mease

Mease Brothers bought Hutton mill to convert to a water-powered flax-mill in 1834, but were affected by the recession and it closed ca 1844.

John Mease’s grandfather Solomon Mease (1731-1801) b Great Ayton, married Jane Humphrey and had 4 children.  He was the son of a weaver and trained as a weaver himself.  He inherited money and his wife brought him a good portion, but in the words of his son John, his “love for cards and drink was such that he was sold up in a few years”.  He joined the army and served as a sergeant in the American Wars.  Solomon’s son John Mease (1767-1849) was a grocer in Stokesley.  He married Isabella Turnbull, and they had 5 children:  Thomas, Isabella, John, Rachel and Mary.  His very interesting diary contains many references to the religious problems of the day and to Methodism.

John Mease jnr introduced handloom weaving of Table Cloths and Napkins in Stokesley in about 1820.  He had a small weaving shed behind his house (now Barclays Bank)

1823 Baines:  “a mill, which Messrs Thomas & John Mease are now erecting, to be worked by the power of steam”

1832:  John Mease bought land and old buildings on Levenside, Stokesley, to build his new mill.  John & Thomas Mease and Mr Blackett, a Leeds engineer whose son married Thomas’s daughter, built the mill by July 1833.  A new steam engine was installed and a large gasometer for lighting:  gas was piped over to Red House, where Thomas lived.  But the partnership failed, by Mar 1838 the affair was in Chancery, and the Stokesley mill closed.  Thomas joined with John in the Hutton Rudby venture, where John had bought the former paper mill, and was preparing to install machinery to weave sailcloth.  Their business was seriously affected by a severe depression which began in 1837.  Whites 1840 states that the flax mill employed 250 hands.  Thomas Pilter, the son of Isabella Mease, ran the mill at this point; he later founded a firm himself and his son became Sir John Pilter of Halifax.  By 1851 the mill is said to have reverted to corn milling. 

Thomas Mease (1792-1862) was a gifted artist, inventive with his hands, a speculator and inventor, and often had to take his family abroad to avoid his creditors.  He lived variously in Stokesley and Hutton Rudby.

Joseph Mellanby Mease (1827-1928) was the son of Thomas.  Well-educated and well-read, he had lost an arm in an accident in one of his father’s flour mills – according to a newspaper article written in his old age, it was the Hutton mill.  Joseph Mease was chief clerk at the chemical works in Jarrow owned by a member of the family.  He came to the village in 1858 as manager of a corn mill “on the site on which the police-constable’s house now stands”.  Three years later he lost his arm through his sleeve being caught in the machinery.

Joseph Mease’s wife ran a school, assisted by her daughter Jenny.  Mrs Mease’s school is mentioned in the Hutton School log book in 1879.

John Mease and his family lived in Hutton Rudby, where he rebuilt the old mill house as Leven House.

1841 Census:  John Mease 40 merchant and Mary Mease 30 and Edward 4 (not born in county) in the household of Thomas Pilter

11 May 1868:  Codling mortgage:  North Side ppty bounded by John Mease to W and Miss Righton and George Davison to E, and occupied by James Stephenson

1872 Post Office Directory:  Rudby:  Joseph Mellanby Mease, registrar of births & deaths

“Given by Mr Mease” 2s 6d “Sacrament Money” in Lent 1873

John Mease died 1876 and his wife Hannah Maria Geldart in 1851:  tablet in church

Joseph Mellanby Mease was the registrar who recorded the death of Mr Barlow in 1878.  
In ‘Northern Primitive Methodism’, there is a reference to a Mr  Mellanby in Greenhow.

EB 38:  1816:  Henry Mellanby of Stockton gent was witness


Friday, 19 April 2013

People of Hutton Rudby in the C18/19: MacBean to Mawlam

... from my working notes ... accuracy not guaranteed ... for explanatory note, see post of 14 Feb 2013



MacBean

1851 Census:  Linden Grove:  Forbes MacBean 60 Lt Col Artillery full pay b Annapolis Nova Scotia British subj, wife Eliza 65 b St Petersburg British subj, daughters Elizabeth 25, Margaret Murray 20 & Marianne Georgina 18, all b Woolwich; wife’s sister Miss Marianne Scougall 45 indep also b St Petersburg;  servants:  groom Joseph Dawson 21 b Baysdale, housemaid Elizabeth Trenham 35 b Stokesley, cook Mary Wailes 23 b HR and boy groom William Ramshaw 13 b HR


Macfarlane

John Mackfarlan was in Stephen Calvert’s class in the Wesleyan class lists 1836

Dr John Macfarlane (1806-80) was born in Edinburgh.  On 12 Dec 1821 he was apprenticed to Henry Johnson of Edinburgh for 5 years.  He did not attend university lectures, taking his LRCS at Edinburgh on 6 Jun 1826.  From 1831 to 1833 he studied at University College, London, taking his LSA in 1834.  In 1836 he married Sarah Bailey Holdsworth.  Their first son, John, was born on 29 Apr 1837 and baptised at Hutton Rudby; he died the next year.  John and Sarah then had six children, all born at Leeds between 1840 and 1846.  They emigrated to Australia in 1849, and John registered his MD from Edinburgh in 1850.  Dr Stout wondered whether Macfarlane was the unqualified doctor appointed by the Vestry in 1833.  [Dr Stout]


Maclane/Maclean

15 Jun 1837:  Charles Maclean of Whorlton weaver married Jane Cook of Rudby [witnesses: Peter Tenisily?, William Hebbron]

1841 Census:  John Maclane 30 weaver and family on East Side
1841 Census:  Charles Maclane 25 linen weaver and family, North End

Charles Maclane, weaver, is listed as one of the Trustees of Hutton Rudby Wesleyan chapel – date not given, possibly mid 1850s

“Maclean son ill” was given 2s6d in Feb 1853, in Barlow’s Notebook

1851 Census:  North End:  Charles Maclane 38 handloom weaver linen b Swainby, Jane 34 b Hutton, and children Ann 13, Robert 6 and Charles Tom 2, all b Hutton;  and lodger Charles Toy widower 74 ag lab “Italian”

1861 Census:  Enterpen:  Mrs Hannah Terry widow 63 b Skelton, servant Ann McLane 23 and lodger Miss Dorothy Garbutt 48 b Marton

Tuesday, 16 April 2013

People of Hutton Rudby in the C18/19: Lamb to Lythe

... from my working notes ... accuracy not guaranteed ... for explanatory note, see post of 14 Feb 2013



Lamb

John Lamb, yeoman of Rudby, was the grandson & devisee of Christopher Legg; Legg had purchased East Side ppty in 1758, which Lamb sold in 1779

1784-6:  John Lamb, Sexhow, was churchwarden

12 Dec 1804:  Richard Jowsey married Jane Lamb [witnesses:  John Seymour, Thos Eland]

7 Aug 1822:  B D Suggitt left to Mrs Mary Lamb of Hutton £100 or £10 a year, as his executor thought best

Mary Lamb is a tenant of Barkers Row in 1829

FQ 249:  13 & 14 Mar 1829:  exors of Wayne to Barker:  the Carpenters Arms with the cartwrights shop and stable on the west end thereof, the garden and the privy on the south & backside of the premises, bounded by road to East Rounton to E, by Mrs Elizabeth Hildreth to W & S, by road to East Rounton, John Robinson and Mr Farnaby to N – occ by Edward Meynell;  the garth occ by Edward Meynell, bounded by Elizabeth Hildreth to E, by John Burdon to W, by Thomas Passman, Elizabeth Hildreth, Mr Kendall & William Spence to N, by road to East Rounton to S; the site where buildings lately occupied by John & Hannah Kay & taken down by Mark Barker stood; the garth now used as garden ground to the E & backside of the sd site;  the new houses built by Mark Barker on the site and part of the garth: some of the houses and the garden ground “at present unoccupied”, the others occupied by Robert Hall, William Souter, George Sanderson, John Kay, Mary Lamb, Jackson Richardson, John Wild and Thomas Shaw:  bounded by house & lands bel to Rev Richard Shepherd to E & S, by Arthur Douglas and townstreet to N & W


Lawson

‘Stokesley News & Cleveland Reporter’, 1 Jul 1844:
Births:  On Friday, June 14th, at Hutton Rudby, the wife of Mr Mark Lawson, of a son


Saturday, 13 April 2013

People of Hutton Rudby in the C18/19: Kavenagh to Knowles

... from my working notes ... accuracy not guaranteed ... for explanatory note, see post of 14 Feb 2013



Kavenagh

The wages of Mr and Mrs Kavenagh are listed in Barlow’s Notebook


Kay

7 Apr 1806:  Robert Balier of Rudby & East Rounton marr Elizabeth Passman of Rudby at East Rounton [witnesses Wm Wood, Matthew Appleton, Eliza Kay and Hary Passman] [PRs]

28 Feb 1796:  bap of Ann Kay, daughter of Matthew & Hannah at HR

14 May 1810:  house & garth and garth:  Tipping & Wardell exors of Thos Wayne to Thomas Eland:  house & garth 1a 2r 28p occupied by Eland, bounded by street to S, river Leven to N, Francis Tweddle & Francis Stainthorpe to E, and Christopher Sleigh to W;  garth 1r 28p on north side of Hutton, formerly occ by Hannah Kay widow, now by Thomas Eland, bounded by B D Suggitt to S, Thomas Jackson to E, street to W and Isaac Whorlton to N

12 Jun 1807:  Martha Kay, daughter of Elizabeth, baptised – her father was George Bewick, and her parents married four years later
12 Mar 1809:  Matthew Kay, son of Elizabeth, baptised – this is presumably the boy later known as Matthew Bewick (qv)

11 Feb 1811:  George Bewick married Elizabeth Kay [witnesses:  John Brown, John Howe, Robert Codling, John Cook, Robt Cook, John Jackson]
23 Sep 1811:  John Kay married Mary Quanbrough [niece of Arthur Douglas] [witnesses:  Hannah Kay, Ann Kay, Wm Frankland, Geo Brigham]

21 Aug 1817:  burial of Mary Kay

13 Aug 1818:  John Bainbridge married Ann Kay [witnesses:  John Kay, Susanna Bainbridge, Sarah Sigwick, Robt Hall]

7 Oct 1819:  John Kay married Susannah Bainbridge [witnesses:  John Armstrong, Ann Orton, Joseph Young, William Hebbron, Sarah Hebbron]

1823 Baines:  Hutton:  John Kay, wheelwright

GA 84:  3 Mar 1826:  Will of Arthur Douglas of Skutterskelfe, gardener:  his house, weavers shops & garth lying contiguous, now occ by George Wright and others, and his 2 cottages now occ by Hannah Kay & [ - ] Peacock:  beneficiaries: Alvey Kay and Catherine Kay, children of testator’s late niece Mary Kay, and testator’s sisters Alice Scorer and Ann Hutton decd

FQ 249:  13 & 14 Mar 1829:  exors of Wayne to Barker:  the Carpenters Arms with the cartwrights shop and stable on the west end thereof, the garden and the privy on the south & backside of the premises, bounded by road to East Rounton to E, by Mrs Elizabeth Hildreth to W & S, by road to East Rounton, John Robinson and Mr Farnaby to N – occ by Edward Meynell;  the garth occ by Edward Meynell, bounded by Elizabeth Hildreth to E, by John Burdon to W, by Thomas Passman, Elizabeth Hildreth, Mr Kendall & William Spence to N, by road to East Rounton to S; the site where buildings lately occupied by John & Hannah Kay & taken down by Mark Barker stood; the garth now used as garden ground to the E & backside of the sd site;  the new houses built by Mark Barker on the site and part of the garth: some of the houses and the garden ground “at present unoccupied”, the others occupied by Robert Hall, William Souter, George Sanderson, John Kay, Mary Lamb, Jackson Richardson, John Wild and Thomas Shaw:  bounded by house & lands bel to Rev Richard Shepherd to E & S, by Arthur Douglas and townstreet to N & W

John Kay and Hannah Kay occupied property before 1829 which was demolished by Mark Barker to build Barkers Row.  He then lived in Barkers Row.  Arthur Douglas left his estate to his niece Mary Kay on his death in Dec 1831, and John Kay is the owner and occupier in the Tithe Map
John Kay and John Colebeck sold a former coachhouse to Mark Barker in 1830

FT 30:  12 & 13 May 1830:  East Side:  John Kay of Hutton cartwright & others to Mark Barker & trustees:  house heretofore used as a coachhouse & formerly occ by James Ingledew, Mary Collyerson & Diana Swales, then by Elizabeth Farnaby, then by Charles Hall, then by Hannah Best, & now by Matthew Garbutt:  bounded by street to E, Mark Barker to W & S, Arthur Douglas to N

late July 1830:  John Kaye, cartwright, “knew Wm Huntley.  About the time he disappeared I was sat upon Edward Taylor’s step, near the prisoner’s house.  I saw Dalkin go to his house and come back again.  Prisoner followed Dalkin out;  he stood against the door cheek and said to me – “That gentleman’s been at my house asking for Huntley.  He’ll neither find him at my house, nor at Whitby, nor nowhere else.”  [Yorkshire Gazette 12 Mar 1842]

11 Jun 1838:  William Sherwood 35 butcher, son of John Sherwood, farmer, married Martha Kay 31, daughter of George Bewick, linen manufacturer [witnesses:  Henry Bainbridge, Matthew Bewick]

1840 Whites:  Hutton Rudby:  wheelwrights &c:  John Kay & Alvey Kay

1841 Census:  John Kay 55 cartwright, Susanna 50, Alvey 25 journeyman cartwright, Catharine 25, with Reuben Bainbridge 85, Joseph Brittain 35 brickmaker, John Heath 20 brickmaker and Hannah Bainbridge 19 servant, East Side

1851 Census:  North Side:  Thomas Kay 23 plumber & glazier b Osmotherley and wife Martha 24 b Helmsley
1851 Census:  Enterpen:  Lucy Kay married 48 retired grocer b Helmsley

1872 Post Office Directory:  Hutton Rudby:  Alvey Kay, joiner & builder


Tuesday, 9 April 2013

People of Hutton Rudby in the C18/19: Jackson to Jowsey

... from my working notes ... accuracy not guaranteed ... for explanatory note, see post of 14 Feb 2013



Jackson

John Jackson 1743-1808 was the master of Hutton Rudby School (see schoolmasters)

5 Jun 1790:  Let the Ordinary be Cautious that no licence be granted to James Hird to teach a Petty School in the Parish of Hutton Rudby in the Diocese of York till John Jackson the licensed Schoolmaster to the Established School there be first called or William Ashwith Notary Public his Proctor who entered this Caveat the fifth day of June in the year of our Lord 1790 [Borthwick Faculties etc 1769-93]

7 Dec 1797:  HR:  William Surtees married Eden Dodds; witnesses:  Thomas & Mary Jackson, Ann Brigham, John Eland, Thomas Hird and Elizabeth Catchaside

1799    Jno Jackson paid a salary of One Guinea “for playing on the Violin Cello in Church time”

Yorkshire Poll Book 1807:  Hutton Rudby:  Thomas Jackson tailor

15 Dec 1809:  William Jackson born Hutton (godparents John Meynell, Sarah Bainbridge) baptised RC

14 May 1810:  house & garth and garth:  Tipping & Wardell exors of Thos Wayne to Thomas Eland:  house & garth 1a 2r 28p occupied by Eland, bounded by street to S, river Leven to N, Francis Tweddle & Francis Stainthorpe to E, and Christopher Sleigh to W;  garth 1r 28p on north side of Hutton, formerly occ by Hannah Kay widow, now by Thomas Eland, bounded by B D Suggitt to S, Thomas Jackson to E, street to W and Isaac Whorlton to N

4 Jan 1817:  Oliver Jackson, son of Thomas & Elizabeth, weaver, Hutton, was baptised.  This appears to be the Primitive Methodist minister mentioned in 1887

Oliver Jackson occupied the Whorltons’ house on North Side before it was occupied by Major Shout.  Thomas Jackson owned property further east on North Side, owned and occupied by William Jackson in the Tithe Map.

EB 412:  21 & 22 Mar 1817:  ppty on North Side: Thos & Jos Whorlton (1) Wm Whorlton (2), late in occ of Oliver Jackson

EH 212 & EG 295:  relate to the same ppty:  a house which had been divided into two tenements and in 1818 was “lately occupied in four different tenements or dwellinghouses”:  tenants were previously Jane Whorlton & her tenants William Easby, Oliver Jackson & William Honeyman; tenants were in 1818 William Honeyman, Thomas Graham, Robert Walton and Robert Codling:  bounded to E by Christopher Flintoff decd, to S & W by townstreet, to N by David Simpson decd

EO 107:  11 & 12 Aug 1820:  land near Jakebarn, recently puchased by Thomas Jackson from Simon Kelsey:  parties:  Thomas Jackson of Hutton tailor, Robert Brigham of Rudby gent & William Wood of Hutton yeoman, John Jackson of City of Durham innkeeper, and William Jackson of Hutton tailor

EP 148:  3 Feb 1821:  mortgage to Wm Whorlton by John Shout:  house previously occupied by Oliver Jackson and now by Major Shout, land and weaver’s shop

ET 257:  2 & 3 Jan 1823:  garth, orchard & houses, probably North End:  Thomas Jackson was an occupier

ET 258:  7 & 8 Jan 1823:  southern part of land occ by Mundell and bought by him from Simon Kelsey:  parties:  George Mundell of Hutton gardener, John Thompson of Faceby yeoman, William Jackson of Hutton tailor, Robert Brigham of Rudby gent and William Wood of Hutton gent:  bounded by land bought by John & Thomas Sidgwick from Sir Wm Hy Pennyman to E,  by Mr Sanders and Mr Wigham to W, by northern part of land bel to Thomas & William Jackson to N, by Simon Kelsey to S

ET 293:  21 Mar 1823:  sale of ppty of Samuel Hebbron late of Hutton nr Rudby butcher dealer & chapman now or late a prisoner in the gaol of the Castle of York:  being the Shoulder of Mutton public house [predecessor of King’s Head], occ by Samuel Hebbron, then by David Hebbron & now by Robert Moss:  bounded by Thomas Whorlton and Thomas Jackson, Thomas Cust, B D Sugget and Thomas Wayne to W and N, by street to S, by Thomas Jackson to E; also the stable; a close of 5a 2p bounded by William Wood to N, by William Dawson to E, W & S, and occupied by William Dawson; also land in Potto

26 Dec 1823:  burial of Thomas Jackson 69

1823 Baines:  Hutton:  Nathaniel Jackson, baker
1823 Baines:  Hutton:  William Jackson, tailor, draper & hatter

FQ 434:  14 & 15 Apr 1829:  Thomas Jackson occupied land belonging to Elizabeth Sleigh

FT 294:  26 & 27 Dec 1830:  Jakebarn:  Michael Sidgwick of Hutton yeoman & John Sidgwick jnr of Hutton farmer to William Jackson of Hutton tailor:  a fenced off close of 1a called Jakebarn:  previously occ by Richard Shepherd & now by his widow Ann:  bounded by Isaac, Joseph & William Whorlton’s land to E, by land recently bought by QAB from vendors to W & N, by road to S

Churchwardens’ accounts 1830/1:  Mr Jackson’s bill 1s 1d

Sunday, 7 April 2013

People of Hutton Rudby in the C18/19: Illegitimacy to Ingledew

... from my working notes ... accuracy not guaranteed ... for explanatory note, see post of 14 Feb 2013



Illegitimacy

As can be seen from these notes, there was considerable illegitimacy.  Alan Marchant calculated it at
1762-71    43 per 1,000 births
1782-91    65 per 1,000 births
1812-21    100 per 1,000 births (when Rudby overseers began to keep a detailed and separate Bastardy Account)
1862-71    88 per 1,000 births


Imeson

FO 157:  12 Jul 1828:  Baillieur’s remtge:  Robert Tweddale the occupant of his house in Hutton and Richard Imenson the occupant of his house & farmlands in Hutton

1823 Baines:  Hutton:  John Imeson, shoemaker
1840 Whites:  Hutton Rudby:  John Imes [sic], boot & shoe maker

6 Oct 1840:  Jane [transcript – in fact, Ann] Bewick 28, daughter of George Bewick, linen manufacturer, married John Imeson 21 shoemaker, son of John Imeson, shoemaker [witnesses:  William Douglass, Matthew Bewick]

1841 Census:  North End:  John Imeson 55 shoe maker, Elizabeth 50, Elizabeth 20 dressmaker, Mary 15, Nicholson 15 shoemaker
1841 Census:  John Imison 20 shoe maker and Ann 25, North End

1851 Census:  North End:  John Imeson 65 shoemaker b Masham, Elizabeth 63 b Potto, unmarried children Mary 28 and Nicholson 26 journeyman shoemaker, with granddaughter Jane Ann Imeson 8, all b Hutton
1851 Census:  North End:  Ann Imison 39 shoemakers widow with children Elizabeth Ann 9 and Robert 8, and visiting niece Jane Sherwood 12;  all b Hutton

1872 Post Office Directory:  Hutton Rudby:  Nicholas Imeson, boot & shoe maker

John Imison jnr died 1(4) Dec 1843 a24, grave401 – not in PRs
Mary Imeson’s burial is jotted in Barlow’s Notebook as 28 Oct 1852, in the burials register as 28 Sep 1852, and on the death certificate her death is recorded as 4 Oct 1852.  She was 30 years old, a labourer, daughter of John Imeson of Hutton who was present at her death of “hydrothorax certified”; deputy registrar Edwin James Wilson

Oddfellows Board:  Bro:  John Imison, Hutton, 14 Dec 1843, a24


Ingledew

DY 88 & ET 601:  Sarah Ingledew was a tenant of Philip Gowland in the Bay Horse area pre-1816

14 Apr 1828:  Margaret Cook married John Ingledew [witnesses:  Robt Whorlton, Saml Hebbron]

FT 30:  12 & 13 May 1830:  East Side:  John Kay of Hutton cartwright & others to Mark Barker & trustees:  house heretofore used as a coachhouse & formerly occ by James Ingledew, Mary Collyerson & Diana Swales, then by Elizabeth Farnaby, then by Charles Hall, then by Hannah Best, & now by Matthew Garbutt:  bounded by street to E, Mark Barker to W & S, Arthur Douglas to N

15 & 16 Feb 1830:  John Ingledew had occupied a house (or the north end of a house) which had lately been taken down and rebuilt by Edmund Taylor [East Side deeds]

James Ingledew was a former occupant of property, once used as a coachhouse, sold by Kay and Colebeck to Mark Barker in 1830

1841 Census:  James Ingledew 80 ag lab and Easter 70, Enterpen
1841 Census:  South Side:  Mary Cook 59 linen weaver, Margaret Brusby 32 linen weaver, Robert Ingledew 12 and Joseph Ingledew 5

Ann Ingledew died 13 Mar 1843 a24 grave216 – not in PRs


Friday, 5 April 2013

An unusual Mortgage Deed

1876 Mortgage Deed

 This is a Mortgage Deed made on 25 October 1876 between Messrs Sharvell & Imeson and Albert James Smith, Esq., of a piece or parcel of ground situate near the Park, Middlesbrough, in the County of York.

The solicitor who drew up the Deed was Gilbert B Jackson of Middlesbro' and Lofthouse.

As you can see from the photograph, it looks strangely crisp.

It seems to have been damaged in a fire, which has shrunk it to a fraction of its former size so that it now measures only about 10cm by 9.5cm (about 4 inches by 3 ½ inches).

This is evidently what happens to parchment when cooked!

reverse of 1876 Mortgage Deed


Tuesday, 2 April 2013

Honeymans and Whorltons

This information is from Dave Honneyman, for the benefit of people researching their Honeyman or Whorlton family history.

Dave tells me that they find themselves confronted by a particular problem dating from the early 19th century.

On 1 March 1818, Ann Whorlton’s baby boy George was baptised in Hutton Rudby.  No father’s name was recorded, and he was baptised as George Whorlton.

On 17 August 1819, Ann Whorlton married Thomas Honeyman (George’s father?), and George grew up in their household.

Thereafter, young George’s surname seems to have alternated between Whorlton and Honeyman.  He was George Whorlton on his marriage to Hannah Simpson, but George Honeyman for all the censuses.  When his daughter Sarah married Andrew Dodsworth in 1877, freebmd.org records her surname as Whorlton (I don’t know whether researchers have obtained this marriage certificate), while an entry on familysearch (source not recorded) gives her surname as Honeyman.  This has naturally led to confusion!

Dave concludes,
“So anyone who has an interest in further study of his family tree needs to be aware that if they can't find a particular record as a "Honeyman", then they should look for a "Whorlton" record instead and more than likely find it.”


People of Hutton Rudby in the C18/19: Hibberd to Hutton Rudby Association for the Prosecution of Felons

... from my working notes ... accuracy not guaranteed ... for explanatory note, see post of 14 Feb 2013



Hibberd

1840 Whites:  Skutterskelfe:  Philip Hibberd, gamekeeper


Hildreth

FQ 249:  13 & 14 Mar 1829:  exors of Wayne to Barker:  the Carpenters Arms with the cartwrights shop and stable on the west end thereof, the garden and the privy on the south & backside of the premises, bounded by road to East Rounton to E, by Mrs Elizabeth Hildreth to W & S, by road to East Rounton, John Robinson and Mr Farnaby to N – occ by Edward Meynell;  the garth occ by Edward Meynell, bounded by Elizabeth Hildreth to E, by John Burdon to W, by Thomas Passman, Elizabeth Hildreth, Mr Kendall & William Spence to N, by road to East Rounton to S; the site where buildings lately occupied by John & Hannah Kay & taken down by Mark Barker stood; the garth now used as garden ground to the E & backside of the sd site;  the new houses built by Mark Barker on the site and part of the garth: some of the houses and the garden ground “at present unoccupied”, the others occupied by Robert Hall, William Souter, George Sanderson, John Kay, Mary Lamb, Jackson Richardson, John Wild and Thomas Shaw:  bounded by house & lands bel to Rev Richard Shepherd to E & S, by Arthur Douglas and townstreet to N & W

FU 487:  16 May 1832:  South Side, tithe map 194-6:  John Passman of Hutton yeoman (1) James Robinson of Whorlton yeoman (2) Robert Pulman of Stockton gent [solicitor] (3):  building with cowhouse & premises adjoining, and garth of 2r adjoining to the N:  bounded by Jane Farnaby to E, by Mrs Hildreth to W, by street to N, by Mark Barker to S:  occ by John Passman & James Harrison & Mary Kingston;  and the house with garden adjoining, bounded by street to E & N, and by above prems to W & S