Monday, 25 August 2014

John Stubbs' diaries (1853-60): Henlock and Hirst

These are my original working notes, made quite a few years ago in the days before broadband and easy access to census records etc.  I have done a certain amount of extra work in getting them ready to post here, so some of the entries are now up-to-date.

They include quotations from George Whitehead's Journals, ed. Helier Hibbs, which have been an invaluable resource for which I am very grateful. 

As with the A-Z of Hutton Rudby people, my accuracy is NOT guaranteed!  And I'm afraid they are not quite in alphabetical order.


William & Ellen HENLOCK of  GREAT OUSEBURN
William Henlock 1805-66 is the brother of John's mother
Ellen Henlock, nee Thornber, of Settle, born ca1807, died 1885

JRS often calls there, stays there, they dine at Bridge Foot &c

Diary references: eg
Jan 1853:  “Recd from Aunt Henlock  26/-”

6 Mar 1856:  “walked to Ouseburn and had dinner Uncle Williams as they had been coursing    We then had tea    after tea a rubber at wist   two table   Uncle Henlock  Crosby  Len Sedgwick & I sat at one table.  Gudgeon  Uncle Pick  Capes  & Joe at the other...”
1 Apr 1856:  “walked to Marton to get a gun for me from Gudgeon  Uncle Wms gamekeeper...”
19 Jul 1856:  “Uncle Wm & Aunt came home from Redcar”
22 Sep 1856:  “went to Uncle Wms   Mrs H gave me a tart or two & a glass of wine”

28 Apr 1857:  “Uncle Wm lent me a gun which I brought home”
14 Jul 1857:  “Smallwood & I walked to Ouseburn   Had some fruit at Uncle Wms   the good people were out at the other house”
28 Jul 1857:  “Uncle Wm came & left his pony & carriage at our house until he returned from Driffield”
21 Sep 1857:  “..walked to Ouseburn Feast.....supped...at Uncle Wms  Lascelles & wife  Miss Haddon   Howe & wife  Old Pick & wife  Richd Paver  Ellison & wife were there.....”

5 May 1858:  “At Night  Sd & I walked to Uncle Wms Plantation  Met Harry Redmayne there with the gun”
8 May 1858:  “At Night  Harry Redmayne  Sd & I walked to Uncle Wms Cottages”
25 Jul 1858:  “Morning & evening to Gt Ouseburn Church   In the afternoon Aunt & I took the Dogs down the Croft”
25 Dec 1858:  “After dinner I walked to Ouseburn   Had tea at Uncle Picks  then I went to Uncle Wms to stay until Monday mg”

20 Mar 1859:  “In the afternoon Aunt Henlock & I walked down to Uncle Picks...”
19 May 1859:  “At night I rode to Ouseburn but the good people there had gone to a missionary meeting so I did not see them”
20 Aug 1859:  “Mrs Henlock & I went to see some sheep & had a good course”
27 Oct 1859:  “Aunt Henlock gave me a gold chain”
20 Nov 1859:  “Uncle Wm had a letter to say Miss Marriner was dead”
    J stays at Henlocks’ in August and November

    J stays at Henlocks’ in January 1860 and for much of October 1860, for the shooting
17 Aug 1860:  “Went with Uncle Pick to Uncle Wms cottage...”

    Aunt Henlock goes to Harrogate on 4 Oct 1860, stays at Settle in December and
10 Dec 1860:  “[J goes to York Cattle Show]  I bought 2 flannel shirst which Mrs Henlock said she would pay for”

Censuses:
1851 Gt Ouseburn:in the part of Gt Ouseburn “which extends easterly from the church including Aldwork bridge”
this is the last household before the bridge - presumably the last house in the village    
William    Henlock, 44, farmer of 280a employing 10 men    b Gt O
Ellen 42    farmer’s wife b Settle
Ann Cawood U    22 servant b Spofforth
Mary Best U 14    servant    b Goldsborough

General histories etc:
“Records of a Yorkshire Manor” by Sir Thos Lawson Tancred 1937: 
“The following surnames occur throughout the records of the C14.......[inc] Henlock”
A William Henlock is assessed for Poor Rate on 6 Feb 1659 at 2d
The name Henlock occurs through the parish registers 1538-1703, and in parish records for the C14 and C15
There is an Inventory of Boroughbridge Hall dated 1718 of the goods of Thomas Wilkinson Esq decd - the appraisers were Wm Mann, George Henlock, John Clarke and George Lawson.

Notes
The farm of 127acres for which we have the Sales Particulars for 2 Mar 1867 was on the other side of the village, to the west of the Roman Road
He is named as executor for his mother Mrs Jane Henlock of Ouseburn in the copy holographic writing purporting to be her Will dated 8 Dec 1843. 
In this Will, Mrs Henlock leaves        “- ring marked John Henlock to my son William & my watch chain & seals also ring marked George Henlock*, locket marked Eliza Henlock, plain black brooch, gilt buckle & one cameo bracelet”. 
She leaves him the residue of the furniture, including her own portrait; those of the Henlock sons who went to New Zealand she leaves to Isabella and Ann Henlock.
   
George Whitehead’s Journals:
Mr Wm Henlock, Gravestone Cottage    built 1843
Mrs Henlock GO died Jany 25  aged 68 years 1844
The Revd Thomas Atkinson read himself in at Gt Ouseburn on Sunday Sep 13  He came to live at Ouseburn in Mr Henlock’s house, & Mr Henlock removed into this house this side of the church about Oct 9th or 10th   1846
Henlock Cottages & Barn &c built at Cottage     1848
Wm Henlock Gt O Married Dec 20     1849
Mr Wm Henlock Gt O died Sep 18 aged 61 years     1866
The cottage farm (Henlock’s) containing about 128 acres offered for sale by auction at the Crown Inn Borobridge  March 2nd  Mr Thompson bought it by private shortly after  1867
The stock & implements of the late Wm Henlock sold Apl 1st & 2nd 1867
Tomy Kettlewell left the cottage & took some grass land of Mrs Henlock & went to live at Gt Ouseburn spring of 1867
Henry Reed second wife died  Feby 10   he is Mrs Henlock’s man 1882
Mrs Henlock Gt Ouseburn died Nov 7 aged 77     1885
The furniture & effects of the late Mrs Henlock (Widow of the late Wm Henlock) sold by auction Jany 25 & 26  1886 
The houses & land offered for sale at the Crown Inn Borobridge on the 23rd inst   Mr Maw bought the two cottages joining his house & the garth at back for £420
Mrs Thompson (Dr Thompson’s mother) bought the house from the     Executors of the late Wm Henlock joining Gt Ouseburn Churchyard & the two cottages joining & all the yards & gardening & came to live in it  I think in Oct 1886


Miss Isabella HENLOCK of/in Boroughbridge   
"Aunt Bell"

Isabella Henlock 1806-1880, sister of Mrs Mary Stubbs, Mrs Jane Redmayne, Mrs Ann Pick and Mr William Henlock

visits Settle etc, hold suppers etc, goes to parties, entertains younger relations etc

Diary references: eg
Mar 1853 a/c:  “Borrowed from Aunt Bell    5/-”

2 Feb 1856:  “....to Aunt Bells read Blackstone & attested her signature to a purchase deed of ten Railway Shares North Staffordshire”
24 Aug 1856:  “In the afternoon fetched Aunt Bell in the pony carriage from the Terrace to see James Brown who had come from Australia”
1 Oct 1856:  “At Noon Father  Mother  Aunt Redmayne & Uncle  & Aunt Bell & Sarah Sedgwick went to Redcar..”
25 Dec 1856:  “It snowed hard.  Dick Hirst & Aunt Bell had tea with us”
31 Dec 1856:  “Aunt Bell had dinner  tea & supper with us    Spent a very pleasant evening”

2 Mar 1857:  “Aunt Bell came from Knaresboro”
27 Jun 1857:  “Aunt Bell & I went to Taitlands”
16 Nov 1857:  “Went to Station to meet Aunt Bell who came from Taitlands”

20 Jul 1858:  “At Night after tea went with Capes  Joe  Sd  Mary Redmayne   Sarah  & Aunt Bell boating”
27 Jul 1858:  “At Night Had a young party at Aunt Bells”
7 Sep 1858:  “Uncle & Aunt Pick  Aunt Bell Sd  Sophy Hirst & I went to Pable Fanque’s Circus”

In 1859, J sees Aunt Bell fourteen times:  she is at the Bridge Foot, the Picks’, the Hirsts, Mrs Parker’s, L Sedgwick’s, he & Tom had breakfast with her, &c
15 Nov 1859:  “At night Capes & Jane  Joe & Sarah  Aunt Bell  Charlesworth  Miss Ruth Stott  Steele & his sister went in Morrells omnibus to Thos Lunds to a party  played cards  charades &c &c & a very pleasant evening we had”

5 Apr 1860:  “[in London] Had a spice loaf from Aunt Bell which came in a hamper for Mrs Charles”

Census: 1851Boroughbridge, a visitor in the Hirst household
Isabella Henlock 44 b Gt Ouseburn

Notes
According to the “copy holographic writing purporting to be the Will of Mrs Jane Henlock” dated 8 Dec 1843, Isabella inherited from her mother:  
    after debts etc, the money divided between Isabella & Ann -  £100 betwixt them in lieu of furniture & plate - the wearing apparel & ornaments, “linen in plate chest”  “my writing desk, work box & a work box made by Miss Wilkinson & also the Punch Bowl given by Miss Baker, the best Tea Service and dessert service”  “poney carriage & harness”  “the portaits of my sons John Giles & Richard Redmayne Henlock” divided between them  -  “woollen bed quilt given me by Mr Parkinson”  -  “my black bracelets, black brooch and ring marked Alice Foster”


Miss Isabella HENLOCK of The Terrace, Settle 
b 5 July 1805, the aunt of Bishop Stubbs.  Buried 17 Aug 1860 at Settle

Diary references:
    It is apparent from the 1853 diary that John is living in Settle and going into school twice a day.  He visits Taitlands and old Aunt Redmayne at Town Head.  It appears probable that he is boarding with Miss Henlock - he visits the Terrace frequently on all subsequent visits to Settle.
20 Aug 1856:  “[Taitlands]  Wm Stubbs & Mrs  Miss Henlock  Fanny & Aunt Bell dined with us”

27 Jun 1858:  “called at ... the Terrace  was introduced to Mr Walter Hills”

27 Sep 1859:  “Uncle brot Lizzie who had been staying at the Terrace home with him”

Slaters 1854:  “Academies:  Henlock, Isabella, Settle”
Post Office 1857:  “Academies:  Henlock, Isbla, Duke St”

1851 Settle: The Terrace   
Isabella    Henlock, head, U, 45, schoolmistress, b Knaresbro
Mary Ann Stubbs, sister  W. 47,    b do.-
Frances     Stubbs,  sister’s dau, 15    pupil at home, b do.-
boarders:
Mary Jane Hardacre, 17 pupil b Long Preston
Thomas     Bramley,  15 pupil at grammar school, b Leeds
William    Skelton,  14 do.- b Leeds
Robert    Earnshaw, 14 do.-,  b Colne, Lancs
Henry L    Hunter,  nephew, 10,  do.- b Wetherby
Edward N Harrison 12    do.- b West Indies, Jamaica
William H Harrison 10    do.-    do.-           
   
Agnes Noble, servant W  28, household servant    b Giggleswick
Eliz. Burniston, do.  U 16 do.- b Long Preston

Memorial Inscriptions:
Settle Church:  the first window on the south side, showing the Holy Family, has the inscription “To the glory of God and in memory of Isabella Henlock, who fell asleep in Jesus, August 17th 1860” [ “The churches of the deanery of North Craven”]


William HIRST, solicitor of Boroughbridge
Married to JRS’ aunt.  Dies 1879.
Solicitor, postmaster, acted for the Duke of Newcastle.

The Story of Boroughbridge and of two Versatile Clerics at the Church of St James in the C19 (1987) by Kathleen M Reynolds:   he built and occupied Chatsworth House.  Was first Postmaster of Boroughbridge.  "One room in Chatsworth House was used as a Post Office.  'Money Order Office' was indicated on the north wall of the building".  Details of William Hirst's professional life with accounts p144 onwards.

Diary references:
many throughout:  cf Mrs E Hirst

Feb 1855 a/c:  Recd from Hirst & Co £5
23 Jan 1856:  “Went to the Office   Uncle H gave me a very pretty neck tie”
6 Mar 1856:  “At ½ past three Uncle Hirst let me off    I walked to Ouseburn......”
12 Jun 1856:  “went...to the station to meet Uncle, Jane Stubbs, Mary Hirst, Cook & the children who came from London tonight”
30 July 1856:  “Uncle Hirst   Dora & Mrs Charles set off with Mr & Mrs Roger Buttery to the Lakes    they drove”

15 Mar 1857:  [Sunday] “Went to do the Mail in the evening as Uncle left tonight for London  Had tea & supper at Uncles & stayed all night”
25 Mar 1857:  “Uncle came home tonight”
14 May 1857:  “Uncle Hirst went to London   Mr Capes was at Faxfleet so I was left alone”
22 May 1857:  “Uncle came home from London”
3 Aug 1857:  “Uncle Hirst  Dora  Mary  Sophy  Hebe & Nelly Scholfield & Leond Sedgwick went to Manchester [Exhibition] this morning”
4 Aug 1857:  “drove Uncle Hirsts Dog Cart to Starbeck  Uncle & party came from Manchester today & brot home the Dog Cart”

Also to his dog cart and pony

For 1856-1858:  he goes to Paris, to Warwickshire, to Redcar, to London
29 Apr 1858:  “Drove Aunt Hirst to Northallerton   Had the management of the sale of the goods &c of the late Mr Hy Hirst   Uncle Hirst came by train   Slept at the Golden Lion”
30 Apr 1858:  “.....Attended sale & got home by the last train at night   went to sup at Uncles  Aunt & Uncle drove home in the afternoon”

31 Oct 1859:  “...to Ouseburn Workhouse to attend the Guardians meetg ... Uncle Hirst called with the Dog Cart & brot me home on his return from Whixley”
1 Nov 1859:  “Uncle Hirst & I walked to Grafton to hold the Court...”
In 1859, there are many references to J having meals at Uncle Hirsts.  Wm Hirst goes to London in March, April and November, Wales from 28 July to 6 Aug, to tea or supper at HE Clarks, Bridge Foot

In 1860, J buys The Times for Uncle Hirst in January, calls there frequently, sees him in London etc

10 Jan 1860:  “Uncle had a telegraphic message to say his brother Godfrey was dead”
28 Sep 1860:  “[at review of Yorkshire Volunteers] Hy Redmayne & Uncle & Capes were reviewed”

Pigots 1834:       
Boroughbridge:  Attorney:     
William Hirst (& land agent to the Duke of Newcastle)
Post Office:  “William Hirst, Postmaster - Letters from London and all parts of the South arrive every evening at seven minutes past six, and are despatched every morning at ten minutes past six . -  Letters from Cumberland, Westmoreland and the North of Scotland arrive every morning at ten minutes past six , and are despatched every evening at eighteen minutes before seven. - Letters from Yarm, Stockton, Sunderland and Shields arrive every morning at half-past four, and are despatched every evening at thirty five minutes past eight.  - Letters from Ripon arrive (by mail cart) every morning at ten minutes before six & afternoon at thirty-five minutes past three, and are despatched every morning at twenty-five minutes past six, and evening at half-past six . - Letters from Leeds arrive every evening at thirty-five minutes past eight, and are despatched every morning at half-past four. - Letters arrive from Knaresbrough and Harrogate (by mail cart) every afternoon at five minutes before four, and are despatched every morning at twenty-five minutes past six. - Letters from York, Beverley, Hull, &c arrive every evening at fifteen minutes past six, and are despatched every afternoon at four. - Letters from Thirsk and all parts of the North arrive (by mail cart) every morning at thirty-five minutes past five, and are despatched every evening at a quarter before seven”

Slaters 1849:       
Boroughbridge: Attorneys:     
William Hirst (& land agent to the Duke of Newcastle)
Post Office:  “William Hirst, Postmaster - Letters from all parts arrive every morning at five minutes past nine, and are despatched every afternoon at a quarter past four”
Northallerton:  Attorneys: Henry Hirst

Slaters 1854: Northallerton:  Attorneys:  Hirst, Henry (& clerk to the magistrates)
       
Boroughbridge:   
Hirst, William, Cl. to mags., steward of manor of aldboro., and Henry Hawksley Capes, com. for oaths and affts., cl. to gr. ouseburn un. sup. reg., steward of manor of rockliffe (and at Knaresborough and Harrogate)   
W. Stubbs and Sharp & Ullithorne

Tithe Map c1840:
Wm Hirst has in hand   
63    Beckside Close           
107    Hollin Carr Close           
108    house, garden & grass land           
109    do.-   
113    land           
69    2 cottages & garden
he has    
Emanuel Heathwaite in no 89, house & garden
Tebb & Johnson     in no 106, house & yard
Warwick, S N  114 & 115, house, yard & garden
total:  4a. 8p.
His house is on the west side of the Great North Road

General histories etc:
“Records of a Yorkshire Manor” by Sir Thos Lawson Tancred 1937
“A Petition regarding the election of the Boroughbridge Bailiff”             29 Apr 1829       
In the King’s Bench
This is the battle for patronage between the Duke of Newcastle and the Lawsons
“......the said Duke [Ncsle] ....holds a court in which Mr Wm Hirst his Grace’s resident Agent presides as Steward”
“...the Deponents say that of late years the Steward of the Court and the Burgage tenants of his Grace have exerted themselves ..... to promote and have promoted the election of a borough Bailiff from amongst his Grace’s Burgage Tenants exclusively..”
Hirst is accused of acting on Newcastle’s behalf; one of the deponents is a Lawson tenant and also an attorney, William Grey.
The Deponents allege that a notice of election of bailiffs was signed by Hugh Stott, but was in the handwriting of one of Hirst’s clerks, and that Stott was a Newcastle tenant, and that Hirst was guiding Stott in which votes to accept, in violation of the proper way of voting   
       
Petition to Parliament 1830, by Andrew Lawson and Wm A Mackinnon
alleges that Newcastle, by means of Hirst, controlled the election.  “The said Postmaster, being there employed in receiving collecting and managing the revenue of the Post Office at the said Borough, illegally and unconstitutionally interfered in procuring the Precept for the Election of the said Borough, and in the Election of the person who was to preside at the Election for the said Borough as returning Officer, and the Uncle of the said Postmaster and Agent of the said Peer was nominated to be the Assessor at the said Election, and the Brother in law of the said Postmaster and Agent of the said Peer was nominated to be the Poll Clerk”
[allege that William Gray had been elected Bailiff and so “only legal returning officer” and at the poll taken by Gray, Lawson and Mackinnon were elected]

[p364]    from “Yorkshire Gazette 24 Dec 1830”
Lawson and Mackinnon objected to 19 votes admitted at the election.  Parliamentary Committee took an objection to one vote, and decided it to be a bad vote.  L & M attempted to establish as valid 18 votes cast for them which were rejected at the election.  Five were admitted “and the Committee in a subsequent part of the proceedings intimated that 3 out of those 5 had been held good votes, mainly upon the evidence of a witness, whose testimony they had since discovered to be totally unworthy of credit.”  The Petitioners failed to upset the appointment of Mr Dew
“It is scarcely necessary to add, that the statement which has appeared in some of the newspapers ‘that the Duke of Newcastle’s steward & agent was also foreman of the jury and returning officer at the election’ is altogether incorrect”

followed by a letter from Mr Coates, Lawson’s agent, denying it all

from letter from John Lawson to Andrew Lawson 16 Feb 1831, re the election of 1831
Boroughbridge
“Gray sent a protest to Dew and also posted up a notice on the Chapel Door similar to Dew’s.  It was not expected that Dew would be able to preside as he had been very ill and was tapped the day before for the dropsy.  However, he was brought in to the Chapel on a sofa and sustained with supplies of wine and jellies. Gray made the old objections to 19 of the votes and also to Glover Slater as not being a bona fide tenant:  but no evidence was gone into:  Hirst advised more openly than ever .... Hirst refused to insert any objections to the Blue Votes on the Poll ...”
[pinks = Lawsons, blues = Duke]

Fletcher, Stubbs, Dew & Stott - banks at Boroughbridge & Northallerton - cf p73 Bp Stubbs’

Children:     
Jane (1824-?)  married Charles Stewart Stubbs d 1848
Dora (Dorothy) (1827-78)
Richard  (1831-?)
Mary  (1834-?)
Sophy (Sophia)  (1837-1900), married 12 Jul 1860 William Thompson of Russell Square, London.   Had children                    
       
George Whitehead’s Journals :
Mr Hirst solicitor Borobridge died Feby 18th aged 81     1879
Arthur Hirst Thompson (our Doctor) & Miss Capes Married July 24 1884 [this suggests that the Thompsons were related to the Hirsts]

His brother Godfrey Hirst died in 1860


Mrs Elizabeth (STUBBS) HIRST of/in BOROUGHBRIDGE
1798-1858.  Sister of Thomas Stubbs, John's aunt

Diary references:
14, 17, 22 Jan 1856:      “Sat with Aunt Hirst as all the rest were at Eagles Clairvoyant Entertainment”  “Mr & Mrs M L Smith & Aunt Hirst to tea”  “Had tea with Aunt Hirst”
15, 22, 26 Feb 1856    “went to Howells with a letter Aunt had missed putting into their bag”  “...went to Capes’ to sup  Aunt Ann, Aunt Bell, Aunt Hirst, Father  Mama Joe & I”  “walk down Milby Lane with Capes & Aunt Hirst to meet Uncle & Sophy”
3, 13, Mar 1856    “Joe & I went to meet Aunt Hirst  Mama & Aunt Bell coming from Mrs Fletchers of Minskip”  “......tea at our house”
28 Jun 1856:    “Aunt & Uncle Hirst have gone to Skipton today”
14 Jul 1856:    “Father  Aunt Hirst & Mary went with the Sedgwicks to Scarbro”
14 Aug 1856:    “Aunt Hirst & I went to Dishforth  we stayed till after tea”
6, 7 Oct 1856:    “Uncle & Aunt Hirst having gone to Leeds I stayed all night at Uncles”   “Uncle & Aunt Hirst came home”
3, 6, 19, 20, 25 Nov 1856:  “Uncle... was going to London & Aunt wanted to go to the station to see him off”  “Aunt Hirst went to Dishforth for a few days”  “Walked at noon with Aunt & Uncle Hirst towards Kirby Hill by the fields”  “Aunt & Uncle set off at ½ past six to drive to Wakefield”  “At night Joe & I walked to see Aunt Hirsts cow which they were expecting to calve”
11 Dec 1856:    “Went & slept at Uncles as Uncle & Aunt had gone to Northallerton”

6, 21 Jan 1857:    “...stayed all night as Uncle & Aunt had gone to Northallerton”  “..home to tea”
18 Sep 1857:    “Aunt Hirst  Mrs Charles  Dora & the children came from Redcar today”

17 mar 1858:      “...dined & had tea at Uncles   it was Aunts birthday”
29, 30 Apr 1858:    “Drove Aunt Hirst to Northallerton”  “Aunt & Uncle drove home in the afternoon”
9 Sep 1858:    “...Aunt & Mary went to Redcar...”
28 Sep 1858:     “Leonard Sedgwick was telegraphed for to Aunt Hirst who was ill at Redcar...”
29 Sep 1858:    “...Dora Sophy & Rd...to go by the 6 train to Redcar as Mrs Hirst was very ill   They went but received a message at Pilmoor to say there were to return as poor Aunt was dead.  Leond came home from Redcar & Mary Hirst also came with him.  She died about 3 o’clock of [‘paralysis’ deleted] apoplexy”
30 Sep 1858:    “...At noon Father & Mother came from Redcar also Uncle Hirst & Mrs Chas Stubbs and the corpse came by Ripon..”
4 Oct 1858:  “At 12 o’clock we committed the remains of poor Aunt to the grave.  She was borne shoulder height by 6 men & a pall was borne by 8 ladies.  There was a large funeral.  Holdsworth & Owen performed the ceremony.”

Memorial Inscriptions:
Stained glass window in Boroughbridge Church dedicated to Elizabeth Hirst, died 29 Sep 1958, aged 60

Parish Registers: Boroughbridge
Burial:  4 oct 1858:  Elizabeth Hirst, Boroughbridge, aged 60

Jane HIRST the younger     of Boroughbridge   
became Mrs Charles Stewart Stubbs (qv)

Parish Registers::  Boroughbridge
28 Nov 1824 Jane, daughter of William & Elizabeth Hirst, solicitor, baptised


Dora HIRST of BOROUGHBRIDGE
cousin of John
Diary references: eg she goes to the Practice, walks with family & friends etc

22 Jan 1856:  “Uncle Hirst & Dora came home from London & Ann Stubbs came with them”
14 May 1856:  “went & had supper with Bell   we had it in the kitchen.  Sophy & Dora came just after   we had a jolly chat”
5 Jun 1856:  “we went on to the top of the tower of the church.........Dora was very frightened on the top of the tower   she seemed quite nervous”
6 Jun 1856:  “had tea at Uncle Hirsts  had a game at ball  Dora struck the ball into Miss Dixon’s face    she cried poor thing”
11 Jun 1856:  “we all 3 [Capes, Mama & J] set Dora home & had a chat with her & Sophy on the front door steps”
30 July 1856:  “Uncle Hirst   Dora & Mrs Charles set off with Mr & Mrs Roger Buttery to the Lakes    they drove” [returned on Aug 8]
27 Aug 1856:  “[staying at Taitlands]  Had a letter from Capes & one from Dora saying I might stay on another week”
26 Sep 1856:  “Drove Dora & Mary Hirst to Harrogate”
8 Oct 1856:  “Dora Hirst & Mary went to Wooton”
3 Nov 1856:  “Aunt went to the station to meet Dora & May [?Mary] comg from Hessle”
3 Aug 1857:  “Uncle Hirst  Dora  Mary  Sophy  Hebe & Nelly Scholfield & Leond Sedgwick went to Manchester [Exhibition] this morning”
4 Aug 1857:  “drove Uncle Hirsts Dog Cart to Starbeck  Uncle & party came from Manchester today & brot home the Dog Cart”

In 1859, J meets Dora half a dozen times.  She is at Joe’s, at Bridge Foot, at Capes, &c.  On 28 Jul she goes to Wales, and on 6 Sep he records that she returns from Llandudno

In 1860, J mentions Dora 9 times - at Bridge Foot, Dishforth, Knaresbro, Joe’s, Heaton House & going to Redcar

Memorial Inscriptions:
Stained glass window in Boroughbridge Church to Dorothy Hirst, died 25 Nov 1878, aged 51

Parish Registers::  Boroughbridge
25 Mar 1827  Dorothy, dau: of William & Elizabeth Hirst, solicitor, baptised
with the notes “Private” and “christened 14 August 1834” added

Mary HIRST of BOROUGHBRIDGE
cousin of John
Diary references: eg        goes to the practice, walks, drives, visits etc
Jun 1855 a/c:  “to Mary Hirst for collars 5/-”
12 Jun 1856:  “went...to the station to meet Uncle, Jane Stubbs, Mary Hirst, Cook & the children who came from London tonight”
14 Jul 1856:    “Father  Aunt Hirst & Mary went with the Sedgwicks to Scarbro”

26 Sep 1856:  “Drove Dora & Mary Hirst to Harrogate”
8 Oct 1856:  “Dora Hirst & Mary went to Wooton”
3 Nov 1856:  “Aunt went to the station to meet Dora & May [?Mary] comg from Hessle”
4 Nov 1856:  “At Night Joe went with Sedgwicks   Steele & Mary Hirst & Richd went with Capes & Jane in a Cab to Crosbys party”

10 Jun 1857:  “In the afternoon I drove Mary & Sophy Hirst in their Dog Cart to Brafferton Bazaar”

3 Aug 1857:  “Uncle Hirst  Dora  Mary  Sophy  Hebe & Nelly Scholfield & Leond Sedgwick went to Manchester [Exhibition] this morning”
4 Aug 1857:  “drove Uncle Hirsts Dog Cart to Starbeck  Uncle & party came from Manchester today & brot home the Dog Cart”

6 Jul 1859:  “Had breakfast at Uncle’s  Drove Mary & Sophy to Norton le Clay  from there a very nice party (who were at Thos Lunds wedding yesterday) of us went on an omnibus to Hack Fall & a very jolly day we had...”
    J meets Mary from HE Clark’s, from Aldbro, at Clarks of Minskip, Woods of Skelton, Bridge Foot, &c.  Mary goes to Wales on Aug 6 and returns with Dora on Sep 6.

    J mentions Mary 6 times - going to Langdon, on the river and at Bridge Foot


Richard HIRST   
cousin of John
Diary references:
    first mentioned at a party at Mrs Roger Buttery’s, 19 Feb 1856
    is about at Boroughbridge, but apparently visiting
16 Mar 1856:  “called at Thos Buttery  went with Dick Hirst to chop turnips for the sheep”
6 May 1856:  “At Night Rd Hirst was here     he rode a grey mare..........had tea & supper at Uncle Hirsts & then Richd went home”
6 Jun 1856:  “[party with Miss Dixon & Hirsts to Studley]......R. Hirst was there”
4 Nov 1856:  “At Night Joe went with Sedgwicks   Steele & Mary Hirst & Richd went with Capes & Jane in a Cab to Crosbys party”
25 Dec 1856:  “Dick Hirst & Aunt Bell had tea with us   Sat & talked all evening”

18 Apr 1859:  “At night Capes & Jane Aunt Bell & I had tea & supper with the Misses Appleton at Uncle Hirsts   It was Richard’s birthday...”
24 Aug 1859:  “About ½ past one Steele Rd Hirst & I drove to Starbeck & took train to Bradford where we were joined by Hy Redmayne   we all went to St George’s Hall to hear a grand concert it being the biennial festival  ......  Hy set us to the station & we caught a train for Leeds about eleven where we stayed all night at a Lodging House”
8 Sep 1859:  “Rd Hirst came over & I went back with him to Helperby...”
    Richard stays overnight in April and May at Bridge Foot.  J sees him some 20 times in 1859; he appears to be living at Helperby, twice walking with Miss Fawcett to set J to the station there

    J mentions Richard 38 times in 1860: mainly they shoot together, but also pay many social calls and on one occasion bathe in the river

In 1881 Census, Richard and his family were living in Helperby

Sophy HIRST of/in BOROUGHBRIDGE
cousin of John

Diary references:     goes to the practice, often walked there by JRS, walks, to parties, on visits, often with JRS
Nov 1855 a/c:  “To S Hirst  1/-”
19 Feb 1856:  “in the afternoon there was a letter from Sophy who was staying at Helperby to ask me to a party to Mrs Rogers tonight”
9 Apr 1856:  “Today Joe drove Mrs Roger Buttery & Sophy Hirst to York to hear Jenny Lind”
14 May 1856:  “went & had supper with Bell   we had it in the kitchen.  Sophy & Dora came just after   we had a jolly chat”
30 May 1856:  “Drove Sophy & Mary Dixon to Harrogate & Knaresboro saw all there was to see it was a splendid day”
6 Jun 1856:  “At 9 o’clock Sophy  Miss Dixon & I drove to Studley [Dora, Mary, Richard & Sedgwicks also there] Got home about 7  Sophy drove some part of the way & Miss Dixon some part & I drove the rest”
11 Jun 1856:  “we all 3 [Capes, Mama & J] set Dora home & had a chat with her & Sophy on the front door steps”
25 Jun 1856:  “Sophy H   Mary Sedgwick & I went into the fair to buy pins &c of Mrs Dickinson”
26 Aug 1856:  “[at Taitlands]  After dinner had some music   Sophy & I ran up to the Top of the Rock opposite”
10 Sep 1856:  “[his sister Jane’s wedding]  helped to arrange about the Weddg breakfast  got Dressed  We all went to Church except Mama   I had Sophy .....had races &c &c”
1 Oct 1856:  “Cousin Jane, Sophy, Willey & Alice went to London this morning”

10 Jun 1857:  “In the afternoon I drove Mary & Sophy Hirst in their Dog Cart to Brafferton Bazaar”
29 Jul 1857:  “[from picnic at Westwick]  Leond & Sophy rowed one oar & Nelly & I rowed the other”
1 Aug 1857:  “At Night Jim Sedgwick & Mary  Hebe & Nelly  Sophy & Mary Hirst & I walked up Minskip Beck  Had a very jolly go in”
3 Aug 1857:  “Uncle Hirst  Dora  Mary  Sophy  Hebe & Nelly Scholfield & Leond Sedgwick went to Manchester [Exhibition] this morning”
4 Aug 1857:  “drove Uncle Hirsts Dog Cart to Starbeck  Uncle & party came from Manchester today & brot home the Dog Cart”

6 Jul 1859:  “Had breakfast at Uncle’s  Drove Mary & Sophy to Norton le Clay  from there a very nice party (who were at Thos Lunds wedding yesterday) of us went on an omnibus to Hack Fall & a very jolly day we had...”
22 Aug 1859:  “At night met the Appletons  Charlesworth  Capes & wife  Joe & Aunt Bell at Uncles  it was Sophy’s birthday   went boating”
  
J meets Sophy about 20 times in 1859:  she is at Powells’, Bridge Foot, Joe’s, Capes’, HE Clark’s, Clarks of Minskip, &c

  
J mentions Sophy a dozen times in 1860:  she visits Navestock with Mrs Charles, he sees her while in London, and in July she is married
12 Jul 1860:  “Sophy Hirsts wedding day    I was groomsman  went with the bridegroom & Mr Jas Thompson to Church at ¼ to 11   they got married   had lots of races &c   Had breakfast about ½ past 12   The bridal pair left about two   Had all sorts of games in the field after that ...”


Parish Registers:  Boroughbridge
12 Jul 1860
William Thompson  -  35  -  bachelor  -  auctioneer  -  4 Kings Road, Bedford Row, London  -  (father)  James Thompson, wine merchant    
married
Sophia Hirst  -  22  -  spinster  -  Boroughbridge  -  (father) William Hirst, solicitor
by licence
witnesses:  William Hirst,  JR Stubbs, Dora Hirst,  HH Capes, Mary B Hirst

No comments:

Post a comment