Wednesday, 20 August 2014

John Stubbs' diaries (1853-60): people A to B

These are my original working notes, made quite a few years ago in the days before broadband and easy access to census records etc.  I have done a certain amount of extra work in getting them ready to post here, so some of the entries are now up-to-date. 

They include quotations from George Whitehead's Journals, ed. Helier Hibbs, which have been an invaluable resource for which I am very grateful. 

As with the A-Z of Hutton Rudby people, my accuracy is NOT guaranteed!  And I'm afraid they are not quite in alphabetical order.


John APPLETON of/in    Dishforth?
Diary references:
?? Jan 1853 a/c:  “for Appleton    6d”

9 Feb 1856:  “At Night went with Mr Capes to Dishforth to hear a little more about Cousin Marks Horse Cause    Mr Charles Mason & John Appleton were there”

26 Jul 1857:  “Mr & Miss Barroby went to Wm Richardsons childs christening   I came home at night with John Appleton in the pony carriage  They came to meet the Bulls from Salisbury which came tonight”


The Misses D & Sarah APPLETON of Dishforth
Diary references:
17 Jan 1857:  “At Night....to Dishforth   Ryotts children were all there & a Miss Rhodes from Thirsk & the Misses Appleton of Dishforth   we had a dance”

30 Dec 1858:  “At Night Went to Capes   Miss D  Miss Sarah Appleton of Dishforth  Miss Clarke of Minskip  Miss Calder  Jane Sedgwick & Mary  Alice & Lizzy Joe & I were there   got home about ten”

3 Jan 1859:  “...in Stotts phaeton to Clarks of Minskip to tea   Miss Calder  The Misses Appleton & Miss McCleod were there...”
24 Feb 1859:  “we had Miss Appleton & Sarah Appleton & Sophy to tea”
25 Feb 1859:  “tea at Uncles  The Appletons & Mrs Powell were there”
They are at tea or supper with the Stubbs or Hirsts five times in April, three times in August, and have tea at Bridge Foot once in December

Whites 1840: Dishforth:  Thos Appleton, yeoman

Tithe Map c1840
Thomas Appleton has in hand no316, house, and land, and tenants on most of his farmland; his house is on the west side of the main street of Dishforth, south of Mr Barroby’s
William Appleton has tenants on his 59 acres

From Graham Appleton (31 Aug 2014): 
The two sisters, Annie and Sarah, went to a private school in Boroughbridge. Their school mistress was Mary Powell, who is also mentioned in the letters (I found this in the 1851 census). They were the daughters of the Thomas Appleton you found at Dishforth by his second wife. She sadly spent a lot of time in 'asylums' (most time in Bootham Hospital, York). I've looked at her medical records and she seems to have suffered from undiagnosed /untreated post-natal depression- which may have often been the case. Charles Mason and Mark Barroby, who are also in the letters, were the executors of her husband Thomas' will, and then became trustees of her estate while she was in the hospitals.

The John Appleton who is in the letters was from a different branch of the family living in Dishforth. He was a groom- I noticed that the entries with which he's involved are both of a horsey nature! He was the father of the Thomas Appleton who gave his name to the Thomas Appleton's butchers in Ripon market place. Curiously, the young Thomas started his working life as a groom in the household of the above family in Dishforth (the family of Annie, Sarah and their mother-in the 1861 Dishforth census).

Finally, the 'Mrs Appleton of Langthorpe' in the letters is from another branch of the family who were also from Dishforth. All these branches were related and came from Dishforth.

Mrs APPLETON of LANGTHORPE
Diary references:
25 Jan 1856:  “At Noon went with a note for Mrs Appleton of Langthorp from Uncle Hirst”

Mr ATKINSON decd   

Diary references:
30 Aug 1859:  “Went to the Fulford Road Cemetery [York] for a cert.e of Mr Atkinsons burial”

Rev Thomas ATKINSON vicar of GT OUSEBURN
Diary references:
6 Apr 1856: (at church) “Had Mr Atkinson at BB in the morng & Aldbro in the afternoon”
15 May 1856:  “walked to Ouseburn   Joe was there  he had taken Aunt Bell to stay at Atkinsons”
31 Jul 1858:  “Sd  Aunt Bell  Fanny Stubbs & I drove Mrs Morrells phaeton to Uncle Picks  met the Howes  Chas & Alice Atkinson & Tom Johnson there  had a game of ball in the field..”

Slaters 1849: “Atkinson, Rev Thos, Ouseburn”

1851 Ouseburn:  this is the house before “the end of the village of Gt Ouseburn, part of”  Cottage Farm, Moor Farm and the Workhouse follow, in this, the section of Gt Ouseburn extending westerly from the church:       
Atkinson, Thomas (44), vicar, b in Lancs
Henrietta (31), wife, b Yarmouth
Charles    (8), b Raskelf
Alice (5), b Copmanthorpe
George (3), b Gt O
Georgina (2) do.-
Thomas (7mths) do.-
Ann Coates U (31), cook, b Ribston
Eliz. Longthorne U (23), nurse, b Barmby Moor
Ann May U (17), housemaid, b Raskelf

George Whitehead’s Journals:
Mr Steward gave up Gt Ouseburn living.  He got clear out July 9, and the Rev Thos ATKINSON from Copmanthorpe succeeded him in the living  1846
The Revd Thomas Atkinson read himself in at Gt Ouseburn on Sunday Sep 13  He came to live at Ouseburn in Mr Henlock’s house, & Mr Henlock removed into this house this side of the church about Oct 9th or 10th   1846           
The Rev Thos Atkinson preached his farewell sermon at Gt Ouseburn church  Sunday night  Nov 15th  he had been 22 years  he has got the living at Kirby Sigston  & left Ouseburn  Nov 19th  they had a sale  Nov 24th  Mr Schofield is going to succeed him at Ouseburn 1868


Alice ATKINSON of GREAT OUSEBURN
Daughter of the vicar

Diary references:
31 Jul 1858:  “Sd  Aunt Bell  Fanny Stubbs & I drove Mrs Morrells phaeton to Uncle Picks  met the Howes  Chas & Alice Atkinson & Tom Johnson there  had a game of ball in the field..”

26 Jun 1859:  “[at Henlocks, in Ouseburn] Alice Atkinson dined with us”

??  21 Jan 1860  “Miss Atkinson & Miss Allan were at Uncle Wms to tea”


Charles ATKINSON of    GREAT OUSEBURN
Son of vicar

Diary references:
31 Jul 1858:  “Sd  Aunt Bell  Fanny Stubbs & I drove Mrs Morrells phaeton to Uncle Picks  met the Howes  Chas & Alice Atkinson & Tom Johnson there  had a game of ball in the field..”

6 Feb 1859:  “[at Picks’]  Chas Atkinson called in the afternoon”
21 Aug 1859:  “went to Aunt Picks  had a walk with Chas & Geo Atkinson”
22 jan 1860  “Chas Atkinson came in the afternoon”


George ATKINSON of GREAT OUSEBURN
Son of vicar

Diary references:
21 Aug 1859:  “went to Aunt Picks  had a walk with Chas & Geo Atkinson”


Rev Thomas ALLANSON, Vicar of KIRBY HILL

Diary references:
2 Sep 1858:  “...met Charlesworth at Kirby Hill  we walked down to Ellenthorp Hall & waited till Mr Allansons Frank came...”

Slaters 1849: “Allanson, Rev. Thomas, Vicarage, Kirby Hill”


Mr Leonard ARMSTRONG and his wife

Diary references:
8 Aug 1859:  “to tea at 8 to L W Sedgwicks  Leond Armstrong & wife & Tom Sedgwick were there  The Armstrongs left early”

Possible candidate:
1851:  Ouseburn index
Armstrong, Henry, 50, b Chollerton, Nbland, fol 381
Mary A, 48, b Bamburgh   
Luke, 15, b Allenwash, Nbland
Leonard, 13, b Chollerton


Bell BALDWIN, Mary Jane BALDWIN of CRAVEN (met in Ouseburn)

Diary references:
21 Mar 1856:  “Bell Baldwin & her little girl Mary Metcalf Aunt & Uncle Henlock were at Uncle Picks..”
24 mar 1856:  “At 4 o’clock Joe & I set off & walked to Ouseburn to see the Craven party mentd on the 21st”
26 Mar 1856:  “...the Ouseburn party mentd above came to dine at our house”
27 Mar 1856:  “at night went to Aunt Bells to meet the Ouseburn party   I played with Mary Jane Baldwin & Alice in the Kitchen”
29 Mar 1856:  “..Bell Baldwin Mary Metcalf & I walked up to Uncle Wms”
30 Mar 1856:  “I am entitled to a pr of Gloves from Bell as she was asleep & I kissed her”
4 Apr 1856:  “..Mrs Baldwin gave me a pr of gloves (see 30th ulto)
5 Apr 1856:  “Called Bell Baldwin & Mary Metcalf up went into their bedroom & had a little talk   I then wished them goodbye as they were going away to day”
14 Apr 1856:  “..I read the letters they [Uncle & Aunt Pick] had had from Bell Baldwin  Mary Metcalf & Mary Jane..”


Mark BARROBY of DISHFORTH"Cousin Mark"
cf. Bishop Stubbs Genealogical History p32

The Barrobys were related to the Stubbs, and both were related to the Morleys.  Thomas’s mother Jane Morley was the daughter of William Morley and Elizabeth Barroby of Dishforth.  Elizabeth’s brother Mark Barroby had several children, all of whom were friends of Thomas and Mary.  Mark Barroby of Dishforth is mentioned very often:  unmarried himself, but obviously very family-minded, he was very hospitable to the younger generation.  His older brother Francis had died in 1837 and presumably Mark had inherited the family lands in Dishforth from him.  Mark was a yeoman farmer and lived with his sister Elizabeth at the north end of Dishforth main street, where he had his house, yard and gardens, garth and willow garth.  Twice John mentions him sending his bulls to shows in Salisbury and Chelmsford, and John’s parents’ cow was bulled by Mr Barroby’s Bull.  He paid for the building of a new school in Dishforth in the mid C19, and according to Whelan’s directory of 1859 “in the pleasure grounds attached to the residence of Mr Barroby, are some antiquities, viz. a Saxon cross, a stone battle axe, &c”.  He died unexpectedly:  “Poor Mr Barroby dropped down dead in his bedroom today” on 2 Dec 1858.  Christopher Barroby lived at Baldersby with his family, and there were two married daughters, Ann Richardson and Mary Richardson.

Diary references:
many visits to Dishforth from
22 Jan 1853:  “Rode back from Dishforth with Cousin Mark....” to
2 Dec 1858:  “Poor Mr Barroby dropped down dead in his bedroom today”

22 Jan 1853 a/c:  “Recd from Cousin Mark  10/-”
May 1855 a/c:  “paid to Cousin Marks men 1/-”

7 Feb 1856:  “Mr Barroby came   he invited me to go & spend Sunday with him which I accepted”
9 Feb 1856:  “At night went with Mr Capes to Dishforth to hear a little more about Cousin Marks Horse Cause”
12 Feb 1856:  “Rode over to Dishforth to fetch a letter from Cousin Mark which he had recd about the jury at Malton”
14 Feb 1856:  “Uncle & Mr C being at Malton   Mr Barroby’s horse trial being heard today...”
15 Feb 1856:  “Mr Barroby lost owing to a stupid Jury  £30 verdict”
    written above 7 Apr 1856:  “Our Cow was bulled by Mr Barroby’s Bull to night (Monday)”
29 May 1856:  “went to Mr Barrobys  I had 2 glasses of Sherry  I did not go into the Dining room as they had company”
20 Jul 1856:  “In the afternoon Cousin Mark & I went to Thirsk......Mr Barroby’s bull came home from Chelmsford having been to the show & got the 2nd prize”

20 Jul 1857:  “Mr Barroby started 3 bulls for Salisbury Show”
26 Jul 1857:  “Mr & Miss Barroby went to Wm Richardsons childs christening   I came home at night with John Appleton in the pony carriage  They came to meet the Bulls from Salisbury which came tonight”

2 Dec 1858:  “Poor Mr Barroby dropped down dead in his bedroom today”

Pigots 1834
Whites 1840:“Mark Barroby, yeoman”

Post Office 1857:    “Dishforth:  The present new school was built upon the site of an old one, by the liberality of Mark Barroby, Esq, of this village”

Tithe Map c1840:     
has in hand 132a 2r 27p, and houses & gardens let to tenants
his house, yard & gardens, garth and willow garth are at the north end of the Dishforth main street

Whellan:  York & the North Riding Vol II 1859
“Dishforth Township ... The present new school was built on the site of an old one, by the liberality of Mark Barroby, Esq, of this place.  In the pleasure grounds attached to the residence of Mr Barroby, are some antiquities, viz. a Saxon cross, a stone battle axe, &c”


Miss BARROBY of DISHFORTH

Diary references:
26 Jul 1857:  “Mr & Miss Barroby went to Wm Richardsons childs christening   I came home at night with John Appleton in the pony carriage  They came to meet the Bulls from Salisbury which came tonight”

5 Dec 1858:  “In the afternoon rode Joes mare to Dishforth to see Miss Barroby & Mrs Richardson  Mr & Mrs C Barroby were there   Left directly after tea”

visits 3 times in 1860:  July, Sept and Nov

Christopher BARROBY, Mrs BARROBY & Fanny of BALDERSBY
Brother of Mark

Diary references:
28 Apr 1856:  “I went into the fair with Mr Chr Barroby”
27 Feb 1857:  “..Chr & Mark Barroby were here today”
15 Aug 1858:  “[while staying at Baldersby]  Mrs C Barroby  Annie Morley & I walked to Skipton church in the morning”
25 Oct 1858:  “Mr Chr Barroby  Mr Jas Morley  Uncle Wm  Uncle Pick & Mr Miles Rainforth dined with us”  [fair time]
5 Dec 1858:  “In the afternoon rode Joes mare to Dishforth to see Miss Barroby & Mrs Richardson  Mr & Mrs C Barroby were there   Left directly after tea”

11 Jun 1859:  “At 3/5 o’clock drove to Dishforth where I stayed tea  ... drove to Baldersby to spend tomorrow at Mr Barroby’s  Chas Nicholson who was at Waterloo was there”
12 Jun 1859:  “In the morng Mr & Mrs Barroby & Fanny & I drove to Topcliffe Church & came home by Catton......At night Mrs Barroby & I walked to St James’ Church..”
Post Office 1857:    in Trade Directories: 
Farmers:  “C Barroby, Baldersby, Topcliffe, Thirsk”
under Baldersby:  “The Rt Hon Visct Downe...& Mr Barroby are owners of the soil, which is chiefly clay and good barley and turnip soil”                     
“Christopher Barroby, tanner & farmer”


BUTTERY family of/in HELPERBY

Thomas Stubbs of Ripley (1735-1805)’s sister Sarah married Roger Buttery in 1764
His daughter Sarah (1771-1817) married Thomas Buttery in 1801
His wife Elizabeth’s sister Ann Walls married John Buttery of Brafferton

The Butterys and the Stubbs were related by the marriage of Thomas Stubbs of Ripley’s sister Sarah to Roger Buttery in 1764, their daughter Sarah’s marriage to Thomas Buttery in 1801 and his wife’s sister’s marriage to John Buttery.  Mr and Mrs Roger Buttery of Helperby were particular friends in the 1850s, going on holiday to the Lakes and to Redcar with the Stubbs and the Hirsts.  Mrs Roger Buttery and Sophy Hirst went together to hear Jenny Lind sing, and John, his cousins and sisters often stayed at the Butterys’.    It seems likely that Richard Hirst lived at the Butterys’ to learn farming.  Thomas Buttery lived at Brafferton:  “called at Thos Buttery’s  he was in a very wild state” wrote John on 16 Jun 1856.  Thomas, Roger and William Buttery are listed as farmers and yeomen in the directories, and in 1840 Thomas Buttery junior is described as a maltster.  In the 1881 Census William Buttery aged 68, unmarried and a retired farmer, is to be found living at Dunriel in Helperby with his sister in law the widowed Mrs Ann Buttery, aged 76 and born in Kirby Hill; she is presumably Mrs Roger Buttery.
Diary references:     eg
30 Jul 1856:    “Uncle Hirst  Dora & Mrs Charles set off with Mr & Mrs Roger Buttery to the                 Lakes  they drove”
25 Sep 1856:    “...Aunt Redmayne...had walked on [from Pillsmoor] to Helperby   Mr & Mrs                 Roger Buttery drove her home”
12 Apr 1856:    “...went to Mrs Buttery’s had a glass of ale   we then went to Mrs Rogers & had             supper...”
16 Feb 1856:    “went with Mrs Roger Buttery & Sophy to the Station”
15 Mar 1856:    “went forward to Mrs Roger Butterys of Helperby & in so doing lost my way”
27 Mar 1856:    “Mrs Roger Buttery dined with us”
9 Apr 1856:    “Joe drove Mrs Roger Buttery & Sophy Hirst to York to hear Jenny Lind”
9 May 1856:    “met Joe who had been at R Butterys to shoot their rooks”
16 Jun 1857:    “had supper at Mrs Roger’s & walked home”
9 Jul 1857:    “supped at Mrs R Buttery’s”
21 Aug 1857:    “walked to Helperby   called at Mrs Rogers”
3 Sep 1858:      “I...Joe & Capes...to Helperby to the anti Felony association   Supped at Mr Roger             Butterys...”
15 Sep 1858:    “...went by train to Roger Butterys  supped there & stayed all night”
29 Sep 1858:    “...Rd Hirst came with a note which Mr Roger Buttery had brought from Redcar
        to say Dora  Sophy & Rd were to go by the 6 train to Redcar as Mrs Hirst was             very ill...”
    stays at, has tea or dinner at Roger Buttery’s five times in 1859
18 Sep 1859:  “in the afternoon I walked to Helperby to take a letter from Bridlington to Mrs             Roger  Sophy Hirst was there”

16 Mar 1856:  “went to Brafferton church...called at Thos Buttery”
16 Jun 1856: “went to Helperby...called at Thos Buttery’s  he was in a very wild state”

13 Dec 1856:  “Wm Buttery had breakfast [at Bridge Foot]”

24 Oct 1857: “dined at Uncle Hirsts with Roger & Wm Buttery & Rd Hirst”

18 Sep 1859:  “I walked to Helperby to take a letter from Bridlington to Mrs Roger”

Whites 1840:
Helperby:  Thos Buttery, gent; Thos Buttery, jun., maltster; Roger & Thos Buttery, yeomen

Post Office 1857:    in Trade Directories, Farmers:
“Buttery T & W: Helperby, Brafferton, Easingwold”
 “Buttery, R: Helperby, Brafferton, Easingwold”
under Brafferton, farmers include
 “Thomas & William Buttery, Roger Buttery..”

IGI:
Roger Buttery marr Sarah Stubbs 18 Oct 1764, Hampsthwaite
Thomas, son of Roger, was christened    16 Dec 1766, Brafferton   
Roger, son of Roger, was christened 2 Oct 1772, Brafferton
William, son of Roger, was christened 22 Feb 1775, Brafferton
Thomas, son of John, was christened 6 Oct 1776, Brafferton


Mr BAINBRIDGE   

Diary references:     mostly with Charlesworth, eg
18 Oct 1858:  “At Night called on Mr Bainbridge”    [first mention]
10 Nov 1858:  “Went to sup at Charlesworths to meet Bainbridge & Steele  a very pleasant evening”
13 Nov 1858:  “At Night went by train with Charlesworth & Bainbridge to Humburton  Had a very pleasant evening”
24 Nov 1858:  “Went to Bainbridges to sup   Charlesworth & Steele were there”
26 Nov 1858:  “Went to Bainbridges to sup of oysters”
14 Dec 1858:  “Charlesworth  Steele & Bainbridge supped with us    They left about eleven”

9 Jan 1859:  “Supped with Charlesworth at Bainbridges”
11 Feb 1859:  “At night Bainbridge & I went in Morrells Dog Cart to Humburton to meet the bride & groom (HE Clark & wife)”
20 Feb 1859:  “Charlesworth & Bainbridge had tea with us”
26 Mar 1859:  “At night Charlesworth  Bainbridge & I walked to Norton  called on the old Folks & then on the Young Folks”
14 Apr 1859:  “I went to sup at Charlesworths of wild duck & pike to meet Bainbridge”
26 May 1859:  “At night Capes Joe Steele Charlesworth Bainbridge & I rowed up to Westwick”
3 Aug 1859:  “At night Leond & Tom Sedgwick Capes & Bainbridge had tea & supper with us”


BALDREY of/in BOROUGHBRIDGE
Might be Samuel Baldrey, b 1830, schoolmaster lodging with a family at Whixley 1851C??

Diary references:
3 Aug 1859:  “In the afternoon Tom & I went with Baldrey to ferret at the Mill   he got 9 before we went and six after we went”

and ferreting with Baldrey on six occasions in September, and once in Dec 1860


The BASHALL family of/in/near SETTLE

Diary references:
4 Aug 1859:  “At night went down in the carriage to the Bashals to tea   Jack Ingleby  Mrs & Miss Wood & ourselves were there   got home about 12”
8 Aug 1859:  “Hy & I then walked to call on the Bashalls  Miss Margt & Miss Alice were there”


BURTON family of MINSKIP

Diary references:
3 Nov 1859:  “At night went with Steele & his sister & Miss Stott in their phaeton to Burtons of Minskip to tea  Mrs Trotter & Mr Musgrave Burton were there”
    also
14 Apr 1859:  “At night Dora & Sophy  Miss & Miss Sarah Appleton Miss Burton Joe & Sarah had tea with us”
25 Jul 1859:  “At night we had Burton & wife  HE Clarke & wife  Miss Smith & Miss Hood at the Bridge Foot”
28 Dec 1859:  “At night Richd Hirst  Hy Hewitt the Misses Appleton & Miss Burton had tea with us”

20 Jan 1860:  “At night I went to Mr Burtons of Minskip & Mr Chr Clarke was there  we had a very jolly good rubber”



No comments:

Post a comment